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First I'd like to start out with. I been playing this great game of hockey since i was a child (35+ yrs now). I decided to start coaching (assisting) when my first child was able to skate and introduced him to the game. Its now been 5 years since I've been lacing up my son's ice skates, and inline skates. He is now 10 he also playes soccer and football which he enjoys also. I also want to point out that I am not by FAR a crazy live through my son's life parent, or a insane parent that rides his child. (We have all seen theses Types). I like to also want to point out that my son loves the game of hockey, were even painting his room Rangers Blue, Red and White for our favorite team and his favorite player #17 Brandon Dubinski. He also wears that number in every sport that he plays. I've set my son to hockey camps 3 times, had several private skate lessons, and he loves it. But here is several questions for you all. My son plays the games (whether be hockey, football or soccer) with no confidence or competitiveness, but every now and then its comes out and he shines, but just as quick as it was there its gone. I have been told by many of the instructors my son is gifted and the natural ability to be a great player, and however he needs to build confidence, and be competive to compete. How do I do this? or will he just one day just explode.

Thanks you for any and all of your suggestions and advise.

   
Newbie
Registered: 05/03/11
Posts: 2
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Wingnut,

It sounds like you are doing things right. Here are some additional resources that you might want to check out:
http://www.amazon.com/Positive-Coaching-Building-Character-Self-Esteem/dp/1886346003
It's a pretty good reminder of how kids view the game. The author also runs this site that has lots of good ideas:
http://www.positivecoach.org/

Hope that helps,
Dave

   
Regular Member
Registered: 08/24/09
Posts: 79
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Bruce Brown teaches Character Based Leadership and has some great stuff on his site. I have purchased several of his DVD's, CD's and books and highly recommend them.

http://www.proactivecoaching.info/proactive/

Also recommended is Carol S Dweck's book - Mindset.

From your email, I am guessing your son's age is about 10 years old?

I believe that by playing lots of small-sided games; asking the players what worked and didn't work for them in various situations (guiding their answers by providing bandwidth feedback) and catching them doing something right - that kids naturally love to play and learn from the game situations.

You need to create game situations where you keep score and hold kids accountable - progressively altering the time, space and pressure situations to eventually reflect a "true" game.

Some skill-based practice (homework) is required, but the natural progression of kids is to 1) play; 2) recognize the need for better skills to be more successful; 3) practice skills; 4) play and see one's abilities develop; 5) repeat and re-evaluate one's skills vs success.

If fun is not part of this equation (all skill-based only practice is NOT fun and kids might quit or turn to skateboarding / snowboarding (less structure / supervision / adult coaching / structure) ... the coach needs to interject fun games to hold and promote interest.)


Dean
M.Ed (Coaching)
Ch.P.C. (Chartered Professional Coach)
Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   
Active Member
Registered: 08/05/09
Posts: 2063
Location: Calgary AB Canada
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Thank you guys, I just ordered Postive - Coaching Building character and self esteem.

   
Newbie
Registered: 05/03/11
Posts: 2
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Once you receive it and have a chance to read / absorb it, let us know what you think!


Dean
M.Ed (Coaching)
Ch.P.C. (Chartered Professional Coach)
Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   
Active Member
Registered: 08/05/09
Posts: 2063
Location: Calgary AB Canada
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Building Confidence was really hard for me but i have done it well
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I will let this one ride for a while and see if it sparks any discussion. It is a good topic but this site isn't an advertising platform. Dean hasn't posted here since last July and I see him and Daves posts are from 2011.

So many athletes have the skill set but cannot perform in competition. Sport is a way we can all learn to make good decisions under pressure. So the question is how do we as coaches help our players to deal with stress and turn that extra energy into a positive thing.

   
Newbie
Registered: 12/04/12
Posts: 1
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Dean and others have repeatedly expressed the importance of keeping score during practice. This reminds me of Anson Dorannce's (UNC Woman's Varisty Soccer) competitive cauldron idea, where he keeps track of stats during practice and even workouts, which are fed back to the players via locker room postings, individual player meetings or whatever is appropriate. Basiclly, it sounds like he is creating a competitive environment where every effort is important. What gets measured, recorded, and rewarded, gets improved.

Has anyone here applied Dean's "keeping score" idea to individual player stats in practice like Anson suggests?

I guess I'm looking for more ways/ideas for keeping score to help keep motivation high and build competitive fire, but have some reservations about creating an environment that is TOO stressful (High School Boys). I'm also looking for ways to help ALL the players imporve ... so any ideas on how we keep the guys at the bottom of the list motivated (if being on the bottom frustates vs. motivates)? Should stats be cumulative or reset every practice?

Looking forward to your ideas!

Dave (the other Dave M) Laughing Out Loud
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I emailed Dean to let him know his topic is being discussed.
Tom

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Quote by: dajmitch

Dean and others have repeatedly expressed the importance of keeping score during practice. This reminds me of Anson Dorannce's (UNC Woman's Varisty Soccer) competitive cauldron idea, where he keeps track of stats during practice and even workouts, which are fed back to the players via locker room postings, individual player meetings or whatever is appropriate. Basiclly, it sounds like he is creating a competitive environment where every effort is important. What gets measured, recorded, and rewarded, gets improved.

Has anyone here applied Dean's "keeping score" idea to individual player stats in practice like Anson suggests?

I guess I'm looking for more ways/ideas for keeping score to help keep motivation high and build competitive fire, but have some reservations about creating an environment that is TOO stressful (High School Boys). I'm also looking for ways to help ALL the players imporve ... so any ideas on how we keep the guys at the bottom of the list motivated (if being on the bottom frustates vs. motivates)? Should stats be cumulative or reset every practice?

Looking forward to your ideas!

Dave (the other Dave M) Laughing Out Loud
--------
I emailed Dean to let him know his topic is being discussed.
Tom
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I coach U-10 hockey, and for this upcoming season I'm planning on using the attack-defend-rest (Perry Pearn 3-3 half ice) in most of our practices. Practice format will be skating 10-15min, followed by one area for teaching the game 8-10 min.( D - side coverage, attack triangle, things they will use in the 3-3 half ice). And one or two skill areas for 8-10min.

So this should leave me with 12 to 15 min to run our attack -defend -rest game. I will divide the team into two teams at the start of the season and they will wear different colors at each practice. Score will be kept, along with goals and assists, I plan on posting the point totals for all the players on a weekly basis. The games will also be video tape for the kids to see themselves in action. I thing the kids will love it!!


   
Chatty
Registered: 06/28/12
Posts: 39
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Quote by: peter



I coach U-10 hockey, and for this upcoming season I'm planning on using the attack-defend-rest (Perry Pearn 3-3 half ice) in most of our practices. Practice format will be skating 10-15min, followed by one area for teaching the game 8-10 min.( D - side coverage, attack triangle, things they will use in the 3-3 half ice). And one or two skill areas for 8-10min.

So this should leave me with 12 to 15 min to run our attack -defend -rest game. I will divide the team into two teams at the start of the season and they will wear different colors at each practice. Score will be kept, along with goals and assists, I plan on posting the point totals for all the players on a weekly basis. The games will also be video tape for the kids to see themselves in action. I thing the kids will love it!!


I like the idea of tracking assists, especially with the U-10s,as in my experience, they are VERY goal oriented. I think I would lean towards really glorifying the team work and skill required to make a nice assist. I also hadn't thought much about separating the players into two teams that might span more then a single practice. I'll have to think on that some.

Thanks
Dave

   
Newbie
Registered: 03/24/12
Posts: 14
9 posts :: Page 1 of 1