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Coaches,
We all hear about statistics such as SOG, PPG, GF,GA.etc. These are the statistics that I want to stay away from in this post.

I want statistics that will help coaches understand critical area's and strength and weakness on the ice. We all see mistakes that players and teams make , but how many times are these mistakes made consistently and what is the percentage of a scoring chance because of these mistakes.

On the flip side , percentages for goals being scored and where they come from.

Example- 70-80 % of goals are scored from a rebound or second chance. ( if that stat is accurate ).
- 85-90 % of shots off the outside pad of a goalie (low ) will have a rebound out in the slot.

Can anyone answer the following statistics.
1- Turnovers at the blue off the rush ?(Offensive) . What is the percentage of scoring chances create from these turnovers?
2- Turnovers 5-8 ft from the defensive blue line on the breakout (failing to get the puck out) ? Scoring chances from these turnovers.?
3- Percentage of goals or scoring chances from uneven numbers at defensive blueline? (Poor back check)
4- Goals or scoring chances created from the quiet zone.?
5 - Point shots ?

If anyone has the answers it would be neat to start a list . Any coaches that have any statistics that or want to know statistics from certain area's of the ice. Learning where the high risk area's are , would be a first step in fixing them.

Thanks in advance
RookieCoach

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The link below is from my older post to this forum.
It's Analysis of data that has been collected from Team Finland games during 2005-2007 (43 games, 184 goals)
Game analysis


Kai

   
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Registered: 06/10/09
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Quote by: RookieCoach

Coaches,
We all hear about statistics such as SOG, PPG, GF,GA.etc. These are the statistics that I want to stay away from in this post.

I want statistics that will help coaches understand critical area's and strength and weakness on the ice. We all see mistakes that players and teams make , but how many times are these mistakes made consistently and what is the percentage of a scoring chance because of these mistakes.

On the flip side , percentages for goals being scored and where they come from.

Example- 70-80 % of goals are scored from a rebound or second chance. ( if that stat is accurate ).
- 85-90 % of shots off the outside pad of a goalie (low ) will have a rebound out in the slot.

Can anyone answer the following statistics.
1- Turnovers at the blue off the rush ?(Offensive) . What is the percentage of scoring chances create from these turnovers?
2- Turnovers 5-8 ft from the defensive blue line on the breakout (failing to get the puck out) ? Scoring chances from these turnovers.?
3- Percentage of goals or scoring chances from uneven numbers at defensive blueline? (Poor back check)
4- Goals or scoring chances created from the quiet zone.?
5 - Point shots ?

If anyone has the answers it would be neat to start a list . Any coaches that have any statistics that or want to know statistics from certain area's of the ice. Learning where the high risk area's are , would be a first step in fixing them.

Thanks in advance
RookieCoach

Hockey is a TRANSITION WORLD... we gotta adapt and play in it!

A turnover must be capitalized upon within 3 seconds! This is why the principle of TRANSITION is so important. The game is comprised of 100's of transitions per game. Look at Kai's video of Detroit with the Red, Yellow, Green highlights indicating the other team has possession / loose puck / your team has possession (a '0-1-2' situation).

The answers to these questions are found within Bjorn Kindling's study "Transition", using the 1990 World Championships (Men) and World Cup 1994. His presentation, in it's entirety, can be found (purchased from Hockey Canada) in the 1994 Advanced 2 Proceedings. Also try Googling it...

There might be additional data / studies available since, but I can't find them right now. Of course, you could record some current NHL or age-appropriate games yourself and code it yourself... if you have time!! (Not likely...!)

Understand that the level he used to study mirrored professional play, with the rules, skill sets and philosophies of the early 1990's. Things have changed... rules, player fitness, height, weight, overall skills, philosophies, etc! So take this info with a grain of salt. It is 20 years old!


A few quotes from Bjorn:

"In top international play, for instance the final game of the 1994 World Cup, puck possession changed from one team to the other 7.7 times per minute. There's just no time to get the whole team 100 percent into defending before there's a chance to attack again... you are constantly playing "transition hockey" "

"In 1990, I studied and analyzed the transition in 'modern' ice hockey. The study included games from the World Cup Pools A and B, the Swiss and German playoffs and the NHL. The result showed that 60 percent of all goals were scored on the transition, which means, that almost three times as many goals are scored on transition as on the power play (23 percent). But how many teams practice transition three times as much as they practice the power play?"

"If we focus on play with equal numbers of players on both sides, then 88 percent of all goals are scored on transitions... 94 percent of all first class scoring chances are created on transitions."

"...if you want to be good in the game of hockey you have to be great in the game of transition."

"FACTOR 1: TIME. Approximately 88 percent of all goals are scored within 10 seconds after the transition has taken place. But your advantage at the transition moment only lasts for about three seconds. Three seconds is the time a top level team needs to regroup from O to D.Your advantage depends on whether you can surprise your opponent by attacking while they are still in an offensive position. This means, you have a three second limit to make a decision which will determine the success of the whole attack."

"FACTOR 2 - FIRST PLAY. The first play has to go forwards or sideways..."

FACTOR 3 - SCREENING. [No longer allowed in today's rules!]

"FACTOR 4 - THE GOALTENDERS. Your GT is the player who can most often start an attack on the transition from your end."

[Do you include the goalie in passing skills / activities where they must handle and pass the puck / be part of the play? If not, you are way behind the times, my friend! Soccer has been including their goalies for years!]

"FACTOR 5 - POSITION OF PLAYERS. As the game is shifting back and forth from D to O there's no time for major changes of position to either start an attack or to get going with the defensive duties. Each player's O position should therefore be as identical as possible with his / her D ones."

I can't replicate his diagram of where his numbers are on a hockey rink... so try to follow me.

Looking 'down' at a rink. Left hand side is your zone (DZ) and right hand side is the O zone.

Bjorn draws a line in the zone to separate the prime scoring area, but makes it go from the both posts, to both end zone faceoff dots, straight out (90 degrees) to each wall and all the way up to the blueline. From the side, it looks like a "V" with wings.

Both corners of your DZ, connected behind the net (1 large area) are 35%.

The rest of your DZ (the "V" with wings) is 46%.

Blueline to blueline is 30%.

Opposite end zone (OZ) "V" with wings area is 29%.

Opposite end zone in both corners connected behind the net are 13%.

"Figure 1 shows the relationship between transitions and the percentage that led up to an O benefit such as a goal, a scoring chance, a shot on goal or a power play."


If you are still interested, I suggest you find / buy the article / proceedings as I can't type it all in; or do justice to the diagrams!

Hope this helps...





Dean
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Ch.P.C. (Chartered Professional Coach)
Game Intelligence Training

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Kai , Dean , Great information you both put up on this post.

Dean , From what you have posted here gives a clear understanding of how practice's should be set up or at least contain transition games. If a coach looks at this information they should ask themselves if they really put any focus on the transition part of the game in their practice's?
The faster you move the puck forward as a unit and everyone understanding their roles should be stressed in practice.
After using a few of these games in practice I can see the benefit of these games. Maybe time too stress the speed of and how important that first pass or read is.

Thanks again Kai and Dean. I must admit I wasn't aware of the percentage of goals scored on transition. Now you have the wheels turning for me.

Anyone else?

RookieCoach

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RookieCoach,

Here is another article on Transition that refers to Bjorn's study. The drawback: does the author definitively state 'how' to increase the amount of transitions in practice? He refers to drills containing transitions (which is a start) but for best effect, one should use games! (I taught this fellow how to skate as a U5... now he must be 30 something. Time flies! Nice kid!)

-----

Hockey is a game in 'a constant state of transition'

Posted in Alberta Edition, www.hockeynow.ca, March 02, 2009
By James Poole, director of hockey operations, National Sports Development


Although, it has been used to describe many different parts of the game, TRANSITION can be simply described as the instance the puck changes possession from one team to another.

It is a simple concept, but many good coaches often neglect the importance of being a good transition team. Well, here is a tip to successful coaching: to be good at the game of hockey, you've got to be great in the game of transition.

It is often said that stats don't lie, well think of it in these terms: the puck changes possession on average up to 450 times in a hockey game. Also of note, in an average shift of one minute, there will be eight turnovers that take place; furthermore, a turnover occurs, on average, every 4.7 seconds during a hockey game. These numbers were accumulated in a study done by Bjorn Kinding.

With this in mind, it could be stated that hockey is a constant state of transition. As a team, you are constantly transitioning from offense to defense, and defence to offence. There are many skills involved in transition hockey that coaches can teach their players, but even more important is teaching proper transition habits & instincts. At the highest levels of hockey, it takes a team three seconds to recover from a turnover and set up their defence no matter where the turnover occurs, whether it be offensive zone forecheck or defensive zone coverage.

So conversely, a team has three seconds to attack after a turnover before your advantage is negated. If you can teach your players the right habits in those three seconds, you're going to be a successful hockey team.

Your job as coach is to teach your players the importance of attacking immediately after turnovers. This habit is all based on attitude. Teach your players to immediately go forwards or sideways, never back, with the puck as the same study shows that 88 per cent of goals are scored within the 10 seconds after the transition has occurred.

Even tougher to teach, is the habit of your players transitioning from offense to defense. Every coach stresses to their players the importance of limiting turnovers, but do you also stress the importance following a turnover of limiting the time before you recover to your forecheck or defensive zone coverage? If you can cut the other teams advantage after turnovers to three seconds or lower, you're well on your way to being a good defensive hockey team. Many coaches work on defensive zone coverage, offensive zone fore-checks and wonder why these systems falter in games. The majority of your problems are because your players are slow at reacting in transition and the opposition is attacking before your team is defending.

When dealing with high-level teams from Peewee upwards, run multifaceted drills that simulate turnovers and teach your players to read & react accordingly. In hockey, good teams maximize their time with the puck and limit the opponents - great teams accomplish this plus also have a mental plan for transition. Best of Luck!

James Poole is currently director of hockey operations at National Sports Development and head hockey instructor. James also is in his second-year as head coach of the Calgary Midget AAA Buffaloes, leading them to the 2008 AMHL and Pacific Regional Championship, and most recently the 2008 Gold Medal Mac's Midget Championship.

(Poole is no longer with NSD but the head coach of the Okotoks Oilers of the AJHL)


Dean
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Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   
Active Member
Registered: 08/05/09
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This is interesting topic.

The question is; do you play fast forward to attack 1vs3, 2vs4, 3vs5 etc. where the risk of opponents turnover is high. Or do you pass backwards to regroup attack 5 vs 5?

But maybe I should continue with this subject in a Game intelligence thread.


Kai

   
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Kai, I think this is a good place for this discussion.

Playin transiton games in practice has players going through all 4 game playing roles. In drills like a 3-2 you just play offense or defense and don't go from defense to offense or visa versa. Also doing games, drills and competitions that require quick decisions such as 2 touch, Baggo, 2" with the puck only get the playes used to quick decisions, close support and sudden role changes.

As far as systems to me it seems logical to pressure all of the time in order to cause the opponents to play out of their "comfort zone." If 22.7% of the time you get a scoring chance out of offensive zone turnovers then it also seems logical to me that your team should pressure in that zone and not fall back into the nzone and trap.

I have known Bjorn Kinding for a long time. He is now the Head Master at a sports school in Quebec. When I talk with him he says it takes 2" and not 3" for a team to transition from offense to defense and visa-versa. I was at the conference he gave that presentation.

The biggest difference that separates players is how quickly they transiton between the 4 game playing roles, 1-with the puck, 2-support the puck, 3-check the puck carrier, 4-cover away from the puck and the game situations 0-Loose Puck, 1-Offense, 2-Defense. Good players can skate, shoot, pass etc. just as well but they don't change roles as quickly or as seamlessly because they don't 'anticipate' the 'next play' but instead 'react' to the next play.

A lot of this antcipation is learned 'tacit learning', that we get through experiencing situations; such as playing many regular games and practicing game situations.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
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Quote by: Kai K

This is interesting topic.

The question is; do you play fast forward to attack 1vs3, 2vs4, 3vs5 etc. where the risk of opponents turnover is high. Or do you pass backwards to regroup attack 5 vs 5?

But maybe I should continue with this subject in a Game intelligence thread.

Kai,

You could continue to talk about stats here; or about Transition itself in Game Intelligence. No worries either way!

How I understand your comment: do you attack even when outnumbered (high in the opponents zone) or do you pass backwards to regroup 5 v 5?

I believe the stats would say, "yes - attack sideways or forward immediately" - if your team recovers the puck after a turnover in this zone. Move the puck sideways or forwards right away as you have 3 seconds at the highest / most skilled levels. If you move the puck back (especially if you have already gained this much ice), you negate the critical "moment in transition" where the team who has lost the puck is in /no-man's land'. By moving the puck back, you give them time to adjust - and might have to wait for your team to get onside too!

Besides, in minor hockey, you would most likely have more time... maybe 4-5 seconds - to take advantage of the turnover (in the critical 'moment in transition') - even if your team is outnumbered on the rush / attack!

This is based on how I interpret the stats, discussions with Bjorn and my personal experience as a player and a coach.

Hope I have interpreted your question correctly? If not, please advise...


Dean
M.Ed (Coaching)
Ch.P.C. (Chartered Professional Coach)
Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   
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Registered: 08/05/09
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Quote by: hockeygod

Quote by: Kai K

This is interesting topic.

The question is; do you play fast forward to attack 1vs3, 2vs4, 3vs5 etc. where the risk of opponents turnover is high. Or do you pass backwards to regroup attack 5 vs 5?

But maybe I should continue with this subject in a Game intelligence thread.

Kai,

You could continue to talk about stats here; or about Transition itself in Game Intelligence. No worries either way!

How I understand your comment: do you attack even when outnumbered (high in the opponents zone) or do you pass backwards to regroup 5 v 5?

I believe the stats would say, "yes - attack sideways or forward immediately" - if your team recovers the puck after a turnover in this zone. Move the puck sideways or forwards right away as you have 3 seconds at the highest / most skilled levels. If you move the puck back (especially if you have already gained this much ice), you negate the critical "moment in transition" where the team who has lost the puck is in /no-man's land'. By moving the puck back, you give them time to adjust - and might have to wait for your team to get onside too!

Besides, in minor hockey, you would most likely have more time... maybe 4-5 seconds - to take advantage of the turnover (in the critical 'moment in transition') - even if your team is outnumbered on the rush / attack!

This is based on how I interpret the stats, discussions with Bjorn and my personal experience as a player and a coach.

Hope I have interpreted your question correctly? If not, please advise...

Yes Dean, you interpreted it correctly. (i'dont mean in OZ, but in DZ or NZ)

There has been great debate over this " fast to north or regroup when outnumbered" here in Finland for few years.

At first I was really sceptic about this puck possession style of the game, where teams if outnumbered would regroup. But I'm starting to see the idea behind it.
Firts option is to win space towards the opponents goal. which is passing or skating forward.
Second option is (if we cant play forward) to create space to win the space, by passin the puck sideways or backwards. So opition one (win space) if we can create even numbered attack (1-1, 2-2, ,3-3) or a odd man rush (2-1, 3-2, 4-3, 3-1). Option two (create space) If opponent outnumbers us .

So as I understand this philosophy, we are trying to minimize the opponent's chances to turnovers. Because if we attack unoranized when we are outnumbered the risk of giving up an odd man rush is high, (our player are out of position or distances between the players are too big.). But when we regroup and gather the five players we can control our distances and we are more likely to be in postion or inside the game if we loos the puck. " good attackin produces good defending".
And it works in defense too, good backchecking keeps the five players tight and allows fast short passes.

I hope english isn't too painfull to read and this makes somekind of sense to you, if doesn't make sense please ask, I'll try to explain my self better.
--------------------------------------------
What I teach is a 3 options.
1. Get the puck and make a play i.e. carry or pass.
2. If there is no play in front of you, you are outnumbered etc. then Regroup.
3. No play or regroup is possilbe then gain a zone. i.e. dump it out, get it in deep.
Tom
---------------------------------------------


Kai

   
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Quote by: Kai K

Quote by: hockeygod

Quote by: Kai K

This is interesting topic.

The question is; do you play fast forward to attack 1vs3, 2vs4, 3vs5 etc. where the risk of opponents turnover is high.

NO - unless you are losing, time is short and you are very desperate!

Or do you pass backwards to regroup attack 5 vs 5?

YES - or sideways or protect puck until support arrives...

But maybe I should continue with this subject in a Game intelligence thread.

-----

Yes Dean, you interpreted it correctly. (I don't mean in OZ, but in DZ or NZ)

Kai,

Your reply helped clarify this for me. I thought you meant if you recovered the puck at your opponent's blueline or just inside...

You mean making decisions at your own blueline area while you are in possession.

The stats show you are at risk if you turn the puck over as you break out of your own zone (35% low in your own zone and 46% high in your own zone) - this is higher than inside the far (opponent's) blueline because you are turning the puck over closer to your goal... within 3 seconds, the puck can be in your net.

My experience supports that you don't want to turn it over here; but sometimes, you must take a risk - particularly if you are losing and the time is running out (the 'risk vs reward' equation).

I have responded within your previous comments. Hope this helps!

Ciao!


There has been great debate over this " fast to north or regroup when outnumbered" here in Finland for few years.

At first I was really skeptical about this puck possession style of the game, where teams if outnumbered would regroup. But I'm starting to see the idea behind it.

Why don't we also look to involve our goalies more on a regroup? Like in soccer? (We need to train them and the players... goalies need to be able to skate and handle the puck better to be significantly involved!) Tonight (Sat Oct 29 2011), if you look up CBC Sports .ca, under Hockey Night in Canada, on "Coaches Corner", Don Cherry (of all people!) shows a recent clip of Taylor Hall passing back to his D in the NZ so he can change... allowing the Oilers to maintain possession on a line change - then attack.

First option is to win space towards the opponents goal. which is passing or skating forward.

YES

Second option is (if we cant play forward) to create space to win the space, by passing the puck sideways or backwards. So option one (win space) if we can create even numbered attack (1-1, 2-2, ,3-3) or a odd man rush (2-1, 3-2, 4-3, 3-1). Option two (create space) If opponent outnumbers us .

YES

So as I understand this philosophy, we are trying to minimize the opponent's chances to turnovers. Because if we attack unorganized when we are outnumbered the risk of giving up an odd man rush is high, (our player are out of position or distances between the players are too big.). But when we regroup and gather the five players we can control our distances and we are more likely to be in position or inside the game if we loos the puck. " good attacking produces good defending".

Not exactly, but sort of... yes, you want to minimize turnovers at any time (especially closer to your own net!), but you still need to equip your players to take on the risks to attack and play with confidence all over the ice. Sometimes you need to attack within those 3 seconds, even if outnumbered, because the element of surprise will be working for you and your team... perhaps cancelling out the shorthanded situation. Score and time of game also dictate consideration in the 'risk vs reward' paradigm!

The puck carrier (and their teammates) need to understand the 'where and when' or 'time and space' or 'risk vs. reward' and be able to respond quickly (within the critical 2-3 seconds for pros) depending on the outcome (either offensively or defensively). Maybe this is what you mean by 'good attacking produces good defending?'

In short, by playing transition games, emphasizing smart possession and support, this will best prepare you for games. This is why I train so much 1 v 1 and 2 v 1... Igor's studies that 1 v 1 make up 45% of any game; 2 v 1 make up 35% of any game; and 1 v 2 make up 10% of any game (at the Junior level)... so a total of 90%! So why don't we as coaches practice the appropriate situations in proportion? We should spend 90% of our time here! Tarasov used to challenge his best players, one at a time, to play against multiple players (1 v 2 / 1 v 3 / 1 v 4, etc.) over and over again! I did that last year with an exceptional Latvian talent, Rihards Marenis. I don't know where he is playing this year, but he might be representing Latvia at the World Junior's in Calgary and Edmonton this year.

Personally, I don't really worry about what the other team does (although I am aware...) or worry about turnovers,etc as this is outside of my control - and there will be turnovers! - I try to prepare my team to play the best they can as I have some control over my practice sessions (game-like, accountable competition that reflects the proportion of 1 v 1 / 2 v 1 / 1 v 2's). I have no control over the opposition or the officials. By focusing on performance rather than outcome, I feel this is better for myself (lowers stress; keeps me focused on the journey, not the destination) and the team!

And it works in defense too, good backchecking keeps the five players tight and allows fast short passes.

YES

I hope English isn't too painful to read and this makes some kind of sense to you, if doesn't make sense please ask, I'll try to explain my self better.


Don't worry. Your English as a second language is way better than my Finnish as a second language!!!

-----

Here is an excerpt from my friend Igor's research study which I have previously posted on this site:

http://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=igor%20andrejkovi%C4%8D&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBsQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fhockeycoachingabcs.com%2Fforum%2Fgetattachment.php%3Fid%3D457&ei=kr6sTuiJK4qkiQKUq4SOCw&usg=AFQjCNG_JDtql6DUfSHGiup4oT90k0z-8A&cad=rja

RELATION IN SOLVING A 1 ON 1 GAME SITUATION DURING MATCHES AND WITHIN TRAINING SESSIONS IN ICE-HOCKEY JUNIOR U 18 CATEGORY

CONCLUSIONS

In rationalization of the training process:

• Dominant attention in the offensive game phase should be paid to solving a typical 1 on 1 game situation. From the point of view of results of championship matches, it is a critical game situation. A successfully solved 1 on 1 game situation in the offensive game phase means outnumbering, winning space, better position of players towards opponents’ goal cage and many times an individual penetration.

• Proportionality of particular typical game situations within training sessions should be derived from the frequency of occurrence of these game situations in championship matches. For the junior category we basically recommend 1 on 1 game situations (45 percent), 2 on 1 game situations (35 percent) and 1 on 2 game situations (10 percent).

From the point of view of the game strategy and while leading the team during matches we recommend coaches:

• To take into account the fact that the result of the match is significantly dependent on successfulness of solving a typical 1 on 1 game situation.

• While improving offensive game activities of individuals in typical 1 on 1 game situations, game exercises and preparation games should be applied under conditions similar to matches.


Dean
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Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   
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Registered: 08/05/09
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Quote by: TomM

Kai, I think this is a good place for this discussion.

Playin transiton games in practice has players going through all 4 game playing roles. In drills like a 3-2 you just play offense or defense and don't go from defense to offense or visa versa. Also doing games, drills and competitions that require quick decisions such as 2 touch, Baggo, 2" with the puck only get the playes used to quick decisions, close support and sudden role changes.

Further support to Igor's results -
• While improving offensive game activities of individuals in typical 1 on 1 game situations, game exercises and preparation games should be applied under conditions similar to matches.


As far as systems to me it seems logical to pressure all of the time in order to cause the opponents to play out of their "comfort zone." If 29% of the time you get a scoring chance out of offensive zone turnovers then it also seems logical to me that your team should pressure in that zone and not fall back into the nzone and trap.

Especially against teams with equal or less skill - even skilled players take time to adapt to pressure when they don't face it on a regular basis! Pressure reduces time and space, so closing the gap quickly, getting bodies in the way, sticks on the ice to close passing lanes, taking approaches from the middle to steer / influence them to one side of the ice... all are effective in helping create turnovers!

I have known Bjorn Kinding for a long time. He is now the Head Master at a sports school in Quebec. When I talk with him he says it takes 2" and not 3" for a team to transition from offense to defense and visa-versa. I was at the conference he gave that presentation.

(14 Jun 2011 – The Fort McMurray Jr. A Oil Barons (AJHL) are pleased to announce that they have added Bjorn Kinding as an Associate Coach effective immediately.)

The biggest difference that separates players is how quickly they transiton between the 4 game playing roles, 1-with the puck, 2-support the puck, 3-check the puck carrier, 4-cover away from the puck and the game situations 0-Loose Puck, 1-Offense, 2-Defense. Good players can skate, shoot, pass etc. just as well but they don't change roles as quickly or as seamlessly because they don't 'anticipate' the 'next play' but instead 'react' to the next play.

100% agree! Quick decision-making (hockey sense or game sense) separates great from good players...

A lot of this antcipation is learned 'tacit learning', that we get through experiencing situations; such as playing many regular games and practicing game situations.

I agree. Implicit learning through experience (tacit learning) - the game teaches the game - is the best way to create long-term Game Intelligence!


Dean
M.Ed (Coaching)
Ch.P.C. (Chartered Professional Coach)
Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   
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Registered: 08/05/09
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Good stuff Dean and Kai and Rookie Coach.

Juuso says that hockey is now a puck position game rather than a puck possession game. It is very important where you turn over the puck. The red zones just inside and outside of each blue line are critical areas. If you lose the puck here it usually catches your team going the other way and gives them a outnumber situation.

I recall a presentation where it was stated that in the NHL the average time a player has the puck is around 2.5" and the team possession is about 4.5" before a turnover or a loose puck situation. In the same presentation it was stated that in the average game a team is on offense 35% of the time, defense 35% and the puck is loose 30% of the time. So those numbers have to be considered when you plan a practice. i.e. "the team that wins the most loose pucks, usually wins the game" as Juuso says.

I didn't know that Bjorn had moved to Fort McMurray. If his wife is still coaching skating in Edmonton that is a lot closer than Quebec. I think Brent Devost is starting a new Edge Sports School there as well.

If you win an offensive 1-1 then you have broken a system; especially one like I use that creates defensive 1-1's all over the ice and doesn't have extra players back like on a 1-3-1.

In Bjorn's presentation he compared hockey to tennis more than to soccer because you constantly go from offense to defense to loose puck situations and in these situations you are always switching between the 4 game playing roles and as Dave says from being one of the first two players who are 'in' the game and the other 3 who are away from the puck and 'reading the game.'

I kept track of the zone entries for the Flames vs St. Louis game in the 3rd period and by my calculation they crossed the offensive blueline with the puck 4 out of 20 times and dumped and chased the other 16 times. They obviously believe in the North-South game which nullifies skilled players who don't excel at the 4th line game.

So coaches have to decide whether they will allow the players to read the situation and make the right decision or simply decide the situation with a one size fits all solution.

In Salzburg there was s Sports School from Ontario coming to play the U17 team. I knew the typical Canadian philosophy of 'dump and chase and hit the chicken Europeans' would probably be their game plan. So we did a lot of transition games where the offense simply dumped and chased to get the defense ready for this style. We also worked a lot of D to D reverses and quick ups. Of course they came with the dump and chase game and after the second it was 9-3 and their coach was worried if we played the third the game would get out of hand. We agreed if it got stupid we would stop it. Nothing much happened and it ended up 12-3. I tell this story to stress that if you have only one option on offense it is not very difficult for the other team to adapt and beat it.


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Interesting topic. Thanks for all the posts. Here's another look at modern puck "possession," really puck retrieval, using the red wings and canucks as examples:

(Attached as PDF since it was detected as spam....it's not, I swear!)

I would argue that anticipation plays a huge role in puck retrieval and transition play too. The question I'm battling with is how to teach anticipation?

Thanks,
Dave

   
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Quote by: DaveM

Interesting topic. Thanks for all the posts. Here's another look at modern puck "possession," really puck retrieval, using the red wings and canucks as examples:

(Attached as PDF since it was detected as spam....it's not, I swear!)

I would argue that anticipation plays a huge role in puck retrieval and transition play too. The question I'm battling with is how to teach anticipation?

Thanks,
Dave

Sometimes the site thinks things are spam. I break up the web address a bit and it seems to work: Try this... http://www. youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=MyilvOyzudA

Dave,

How do YOU think you teach anticipation???

(Loaded question; but not a trick question! It is meant to make you think... "Implicit learning" at work here, Dave!)

Please follow up with your answer to this one in the Game Intelligence forum...


Dean
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Okay I'll try to answer to this first....

Quote by: hockeygod


The puck carrier (and their teammates) need to understand the 'where and when' or 'time and space' or 'risk vs. reward' and be able to respond quickly (within the critical 2-3 seconds for pros) depending on the outcome (either offensively or defensively). Maybe this is what you mean by 'good attacking produces good defending?'

Yes... it's defensive readiness when attacking... I don't know if if this is good example but I'll try.
Here is a diagram of quite typical Finnish "delay" or controlled break out.

Here's how it continious to NZ. F1 (with the puck) should keep the puck to draw the opponents Ds closer to him and then pass to F2 or 3

This is how they enter the OZ wide, with good balance (3 lanes) now from here we are ready to use that 3 seconds if there is a loose puck from shot or from goalie's save and we are allso ready to react and give pressure if we have to defend. It's too bad i made these diagrams for another subject so it doesn't show Ds movement.
D1 plays to the high slot


It's getting late here, I hope it makes some sense.


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Kai,

Your reply helped clarify this for me. I thought you meant if you recovered the puck at your opponent's blueline or just inside...

You mean making decisions at your own blueline area while you are in possession.

The stats show you are at risk if you turn the puck over as you break out of your own zone (35% low in your own zone and 46% high in your own zone) - this is higher than inside the far (opponent's) blueline because you are turning the puck over closer to your goal... within 3 seconds, the puck can be in your net.

My experience supports that you don't want to turn it over here; but sometimes, you must take a risk - particularly if you are losing and the time is running out (the 'risk vs reward' equation).

I have responded within your previous comments. Hope this helps!

Dean, I have drawn the diagram (rough) with the information you put in your original post. From your quote you replied to Kai with it helps make more sense. I put the stats down but wasn't sure exactly what it all meant. (higher risk zones and percentages).

I have said before I am fairly new to this site. But of all the information drills, games etc., the DT Transition games have caught my attention the most. This topic is only making it more interesting for me. I will be trying to pull all the little stats you all have posted so far for future reference.
Thanks again guys. I will sit back and let the experts post this great information. You are definitely a lot more knowledgeable than I.

RookieCoach

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Kai,

"...defensive readiness when attacking" - I understand perfectly now! I agree - you want to be ready to pounce on a loose puck or forecheck (back pressure / backcheck) from a position of strength, in a perfect world!

I love your diagrams. You are way ahead of me technology-wise! Can you please email me a blank one and tell me what program did you use to draw this stuff on it? I might be able to draw the diagram with the percentages on it - then I can post it.

Thanks!


Dean
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Quote by: RookieCoach



Dean, I have drawn the diagram (rough) with the information you put in your original post. From your quote you replied to Kai with it helps make more sense. I put the stats down but wasn't sure exactly what it all meant. (higher risk zones and percentages).

I have said before I am fairly new to this site. But of all the information drills, games etc., the DT Transition games have caught my attention the most. This topic is only making it more interesting for me. I will be trying to pull all the little stats you all have posted so far for future reference.

Thanks again guys. I will sit back and let the experts post this great information. You are definitely a lot more knowledgeable than I.

RookieCoach

RookieCoach,

Email me directly if you want further clarification - we can exchange phone numbers and discuss this on the phone. I am always willing to help share ideas.

Knowledge comes from making lots of mistakes! Wink

Regards,


Dean
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Rookie Coach and Dean.

I share my material such as the transition games that you refer to. I would like to read the discussion about them.

How have you used them? What adjustments have you made? How did the players adapt to them???? Do they seem to make a difference in the way your team plays in regulation games?


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Let me pose a question.

Dean posted how an American Football coach uses stats to justify never kicking off or punting because to go for the first down or the short kick is better percentage ball than giving the other team the ball a few yards farther down the field.

The Finnish study on scoring chances from various zones that Kai posted shows that you get a scoring chance about 22% of the time when you forecheck hard and cause a turn over in the offensive end. The defensive team gets a scoring chance about 5% of the time attacking from the defensive zone.

When you look at these stats what kind of forecheck do you think is most effective. Do you think that 17% rish/reward factor is worth taking advantage of.?

Some examples
1-4
1-3-1 passive
1-3-1 hard trap
2-2-1
2-1-2
2-1-2 pinch on the strong side
2-1-2 pinch on a wide rim
2-1-2 left wing lock
2-3

These are some common ones and I am sure there are many more.

I would like to read some opinions.


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Quote by: TomM

Rookie Coach and Dean.

I share my material such as the transition games that you refer to. I would like to read the discussion about them.

How have you used them? What adjustments have you made? How did the players adapt to them???? Do they seem to make a difference in the way your team plays in regulation games?

Tom / coaches,

Since I coach at skill academies (therefore no team!), I can't extrapolate the impact of the transition games in a team setting. But I have my suspicions... plus some experience back from when I was coaching a team!

I think that 'teaching the game through the game' philosophy using our Game Intelligence activities and Tom's ABC games are the most effective way to teach.

In my 8th year of teaching grade 7-12 in skill academies, the players really express their desire to play our Game Intelligence Training activities! Kids love to move; to compete; to play. They hate standing around, either listening to a coach talk, or do the same boring thing ad nauseum. I haven't used Tom's ABC games as much as I would like; I feel they are ideally suited if you have groups that are similar ages and skill levels - like on an age group team. In our academies, we have a very wide spread of skills and ages and levels - from immigrants first time on the ice; to learn to skate kids; to community house level; to ringette players; to girls hockey players; to division 1-9 community; to bantam AA and AAA / minor midget AAA / midget AA / midget AAA!

One of my Cochrane academies has a fairly homogenous group of midget players (depending on the semester, we average between 12 skaters / 2 goalies to 18 skaters, 3 goalies) and I have adapted some of Tom's ABC games there in the past with much success (Tom came out as a guest coach once last year). Primarily we use GIT and compete every day, keeping score throughout the semester.

My Cochrane kids have asked me to coach their midget AA team for the past several years after experiencing the 'different' methodology and the GIT! They don't 'like' their 'regular' style of coaching as much as they like my GIT approach. The teacher and principal are always commenting, "I don't know what you are doing in Sport Performance but the kids are always talking about it and looking forward to it..." to "The kids are getting to the rink 30 minutes earlier than they need to be with the hope that you will get there early too, so they can play more of your games" to "The kids are always chirping each other on the bus on the way back - celebrating who won the game today - and who 'sucked'... they sure have fun in your class!" I think that these frequent comments from the teachers and administration, along with the kids constantly asking me to coach their team, over a several year period, that there is more than a little something going on here... no?

This can also be said of all the players (and coaches) when I have given clinics. Using the 'normal, old-school boring drills way', everyone gets antsy, starts screwing around, not paying attention and very little opportunities for inspired, deliberate practice are provided. 'Coach Whisperer's' who provide a spark / ignition, need not apply... this is a 'De-training Mission!' For example, why do we ask kids to stand still and handle a puck for 2 - 5+ minutes - similar to a 'typical' hockey school / skills session? Their focus and attention span is about 10 seconds. Even the most dedicated ones can't do this. Try doing something like this yourself. Put a timer on and stick handle (or whatever) for 5 minutes. Did you do it? Did you keep perfect form? Did your mind wander? Were you bored to tears? How much of those 5 minutes do you think could be actually classified as 'deliberate practice'? Argh!

When I introduce our Game Intelligence Training and 'the game is the best teacher' (minimal talking on behalf of the coach - maximal competitive activity on behalf of the players), the players and coaches (when they participate as players) LOVE IT! It is such a positive change! I have done "old school' and GIT on players from U5 to U18. The feedback I ALWAYS receive is: "NO!" to old-school; "YES" to GIT!

Now when coaches participate at clinics as coaches, sometimes it takes time to educate them on the 'new ways' and it can be frustrating for them; particularly if they are not open minded and / or experienced. That is why I like to run my clinics with the coaches PARTICIPATING as players - FIRST in dryland and THEN on ice - AS I help educate them on the theory. This absolutely sells the methodology and the games to them! THEN I have them coach their age group kids using the same stuff they experienced (from a participant's eyes) and mentor them.

I think I am at about a 99% success rate / buy in from the coaches if I do these things first. If I do only theory (sit and take notes / classroom session) or start trying to teach them 'how to coach' this way, my positive feedback and success rate drops significantly. It might go as low as 50% or less. "I hear, I see, I do"...

Now some comments from when I was coaching...

When I took over the U of C Dinos (girls) at the end of the year, at John's prodding, we started training in the gymnasium 5 times per week for 1.5 hours and we used our Smart Transitional Games. We saw an immediate increase in competitiveness and intensity. We did a few of these on the ice the next two years (I was still a 'drill coach' at this point - starting to evolve, thanks to John!) and I really thought they prepared the players for a 'real game'. We continued to do our Smart Transitional Games in the gym three days per week right after morning practice, for 1 hour. I wish we had video footage... truly these were magical times as the players drastically improved their understanding of the game (as did I!)

As Tom will attest, we had a pretty poorly skilled team in the first two years I was there. We had inherited some absolutely excellent people, but their skill sets did not allow us to compete at the level required... so in my last (third) year, we made wholesale changes because I recruited like crazy. The rookies had better skill sets than the vets, so I think we only kept 1 skater and 1 or 2 goalies that third year. It was one of the toughest things to have to cut some people you went to battle with for the previous two years; but in the interest of improving the program, I had to 'take the harder right'. So we were really young (avg age -18) and lacked leadership depth (our returning vet, Beth, was excellent) but our performance really picked up. We closed the goal differential (for and against), competed much harder and started winning. Larry Hofmann, another fellow I coached against for those three years said we steadily improved our skill set and by the third year; he hated playing us because we always competed so damn hard... his girls weren't used to our intensity. Just shows you what these games will do (primarily off-ice in this example because I was still more of a Neanderthal coach, but if we would have used them more often on ice, I think we would have had even better results.)

If I had to do it all again, with an average-to-good group (ie: relatively open mindset) of college players, I would really embrace these activities / style of coaching full-time on and off-ice and I believe the players would seen the benefits too! At the university / pro categories, one would need to 'take the temperature in the room', identify the leadership core and make sure they understood that this approach will make them individually better; which in turn will make the team collectively better. It is up to the coach to make sure they approach it / sell it the 'right' way.

Now that I have had several years to experiment with our Game Intelligence Training and philosophy and Tom's ABC activities in the skill academy / coaching clinic / private coach mentoring settings, etc, I see how quickly and significantly they can make a positive difference.

Aside form the philosophy and activities, the aspect that makes the biggest difference is coaching experience. From this I mean that you, Tom, are personally highly experienced as an educator and specifically, with your ABC games; thus you can tailor individual activities from the book to suit your age, skill level, number of athletes, etc. on the fly. Just because someone reads your book, doesn't mean they will be able to run your activities as successfully as you... they won't have the same gut feel, eye for detail; nor the ability to know how to fine-tune them to make them work the best. This comes with experience. Same as with our Game Intelligence Training.

But I encourage coaches to try this philosophy ("let the game teach the game") and these activities; but have patience! Keep notes and challenge yourself and your other coaches. John and I are constantly learning every day, "How can we fine-tune our games?" Once we think we have one mastered, something surprises us and we tweak it. The day you stop learning is the day you need to get out of coaching and do something else!


Dean
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Good post Dean. My comment was meant to keep the discussion public so all the coaches could see it and cause them to think. It wasn't a criticism. I remember your team constantly improving the last season you coached at the U of C and you gave us a good run in the playoffs.

Erkka Westerlund is more or less the 'Father of Transition Games' and did a very good booklet and video on them in the mid 90's. HC brought him to Calgary for half a season and he prepared it here. I helped him a little with the english and he brought me to Vierumaki, Finland a couple of times to be the head instructor at the summer hockey school.

I have made a pdf of the introductory pages which gives an description of transition games with a good graphic of game transitions.

The second pdf is Erkka's presentation on Finlands preparation for the 2006 Olympics. They ended up in the finals and winning the Silver Medal. Erkka presented this at the 2007 coaching conference in Vierumaki and it is a great outline of how they played, the systems they used etc.


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Quote by: TomM

Rookie Coach and Dean.

I share my material such as the transition games that you refer to. I would like to read the discussion about them.

How have you used them? What adjustments have you made? How did the players adapt to them???? Do they seem to make a difference in the way your team plays in regulation games?

Tom, As I mentioned earlier in this post somewhere , I'm fairly new to your site. After purchasing your book (Hockey Coaching ABC's Book 2) it has made me think about game situation roles and game phases. Your book contains a different way of looking and reading the game than the typical hockey book OR course.

I mentioned too Dean that the DT transition drills on this site caught my attention the most. I guess that's is why I asked the question about Statistics - for critical area's on the ice. Referring to turnovers and the transition part of the game. Some of these stats that have been posted here by yourself ,Dean Kai , Dave really have to make a coach look at this part of the game.

Last practice that I ran for a local team , I used D100 2/3 s ice Attack-defend- rest games. Also Dean suggested to me about card240 of your book and card 241 when I was asking about backchecking games.
The flow was great , the players picked up on these games quickly. It was an introduction for them and myself running these games. I would stress the quickness and supporting player making himself available sooner next time , but for the first time all went well. I will definitely try them again.
I have used foe a few years now a game at the end of practice. Box game with jokers at the point. 2on2 but the rule is before they can attack they must pass to their joker who now joins in for a 3on2 , 3 on 3 etc, Players for some reason love this game.

Thanks again for your input on these statistics. I don't know where Dean finds all these articles but it's great reading and learning material.
One thing I will say at times it's overwhelming trying to implement a new type of practice from the old traditional way. I seem to be the type of coach that must understand it completely before hit the or try new things. I like for the players too think I know what I'm talking about.
Thanks

RookieCoach
---------------
RK, it takes a while to get used to "Looking at old things through New Eyes." I met Juhani in 85 when he was brought here to do a coaching symposium at the university. I was head coach of a college mens team at the time. I knew team play etc. but my practices were pretty standard drills centred and not very good. Juuso was only here for two weeks but in a 40 hour seminar you get a lot of info. I found that he was running hockey practices in much the same way I taught my PE classes. He also was a PE teacher and had players like the Koivu brothers and Kirprosov in his hockey class. He asked me to start writing the manual with him and I got more familiar with using games, tournament, modified rules etc. in pracitce. Erkka came here in the early 90's and much the same thing happened with transition games.

The thing that really forced me to use these ideas was I went to a new school and now had double PE classes. 48-60 students at once in a small gym for 13 years. It was become more efficient or die. The model of small teams, tournaments, modified rules made it easy to teach these large groups. There is a video of one of the classes in the files section. You can see how many kid's are in the small space.

Good luck with it! I enjoy reading the discussions you start because they stimulate me to look for workable solutions to the problems mentioned.

An aside is that I got a call from Finland this morning to inform me that one of the 93 born players I coached with the Red Bulls in Austria has just been named to the Finnish U19 team. They play a tournament in Switzerland and 2 of the D from the U19 team will join the U20 team at the World Championships here just after Christmass. So go Otso go.

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Quote by: TomM

Good post Dean. My comment was meant to keep the discussion public so all the coaches could see it and cause them to think. It wasn't a criticism. I remember your team constantly improving the last season you coached at the U of C and you gave us a good run in the playoffs.

Erkka Westerlund is more or less the 'Father of Transition Games' and did a very good booklet and video on them in the mid 90's. HC brought him to Calgary for half a season and he prepared it here. I helped him a little with the english and he brought me to Vierumaki, Finland a couple of times to be the head instructor at the summer hockey school.

Tom,

I just wanted to follow up with RookieCoach by phone because I get tired of typing...! He sent me an email, so hopefully we can talk... and save my fingers!

I worked at HC in the early 1990's while Erkka and Slava were here. I was quite interested in their manuals and helped with the layout and design. (I also worked directly with Tom Renney and Mike Johnston on the "40 of the Best" manual - contributing a few drills, doing the layout and design ('blueprint') with the printers and getting it produced. Rob Cookson and I created and produced the "Power Play" instructional video in the mid 1990's.)

You are lucky you got to go to Finland to do those camps. I am still waiting to go... anybody want to do a camp in Finland or Sweden???!!! (I played hockey in Finland and Sweden and would love to go back in the spring or summer 'when it is nice and sunny out!' Bloody cold during the winters... and dark!)


Dean
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Quote by: RookieCoach



Thanks again for your input on these statistics. I don't know where Dean finds all these articles but it's great reading and learning material.

One thing I will say at times it's overwhelming trying to implement a new type of practice from the old traditional way. I seem to be the type of coach that must understand it completely before hit the or try new things. I like for the players too think I know what I'm talking about.

Thanks

RookieCoach

RK,

Thanks for the email - I will be in touch in a day or two... gotta take the kids out for Hallowe'en tonight!

I read extensively and have been coaching since the early 1980's... so I have lots of binders, 'friends in high and low places... and all levels in between' so articles are not hard to find!

Nice to have some feedback that someone reads them - thank you!

I must admit, some articles that I post reflect my own biases (particularly on hazing, abuse, general stupidity because I think it is our moral obligation of coaches to put an end to it! Not only was my dad a victim of sexual abuse from a trusted boy scout leader, I was bullied and hazed as a player myself... Why? How did this make me 'part of the team?' I still get pissed thinking about it and I sure as HELL don't want this to happen to ANY kids under my watch as an educator / coach... or happen to my OWN kids if they choose to play. (Tom, I know you have some stories to tell - I will leave that up to you.)

I get depressed reading all of theses depressing stories; but I think they need to be made an issue until they go away... which I hope they will! "If we ignore our history, we are doomed to repeat our past." It is tougher to find 'good news' for the Inspirational forum, but I hope it somewhat balances all the doom and gloom.) Others I post because I think they might be of interest to the regular readers of the site. Maybe someone will find something to 'spark' their interest? I hope that whatever I post, it has a special meaning for someone out there... I like to try to inspire people; get them to think.

RK, I was overwhelmed by all these new ideas and methodologies at first, too. I would say I went through a period of time where it was a process... try one thing and then retreat back to my comfort zone... then try another; or tweak something... then I had an epiphany, then settled back into more of a process. As the YEARS go by (and with John always talking to me daily), I grow bolder and now I have firmly "crossed over" to the "Game is the best teacher" side and have no regrets. I have daily "Ah Ha" moments when I do our Game Intelligence activities. This site helps me by allowing me to express some of them; and other questions / comments by others help me / challenge me to answer them using my methodology and 'where I am right now as a coach' on the trajectory of my coaching evolution. Yes, I am cognizant of how I introduce it, but my firm belief in it being 'the right way' and my self-confidence based on much trial and error, allows me to do so. Most players / coaches, if you show them the individual benefits and how it can help their team, they will buy in. The key is to get them to participate in it. Whenever possible, as above, I start with dryland first...

This 'Coaching REVOLUTION' takes time... I had the good fortune of a daily mentor (John the Colombian) and people like Tom, and several other coaches at various levels (college, university, pro, international) who I could turn to in times of indecision or doubt. If you don't have that... your (R)evolution may take longer; or not happen at all! Everybody needs a mentor of some sort!

Keep experimenting RK. It's OK to make mistakes. That's how we advance ourselves and society.

This is why I think we need to do a GAME INTELLIGENCE / ABC's COACHING CLINIC here in Calgary (and invite people on this forum to attend)... any interest? JOhn and I just did one a month ago and are looking to do another in the spring. (I would say lets do it in Hawaii, or somewhere warmer, but in Calgary, we are well-connected: we can get facilities and access to players to 'experiment with' during the clinic.) But if some of you think we could do something in your local area, email me. If we could get a bunch of players and coaches who could pay a fee, this would help offset the costs of John, myself and Tom coming to your area...!


Dean
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Dean I used powerpoint to make these diagrams.

Not exactly, but sort of... yes, you want to minimize turnovers at any time (especially closer to your own net!), but you still need to equip your players to take on the risks to attack and play with confidence all over the ice. Sometimes you need to attack within those 3 seconds, even if outnumbered, because the element of surprise will be working for you and your team... perhaps cancelling out the shorthanded situation. Score and time of game also dictate consideration in the 'risk vs reward' paradigm!

So here are the numbers from the defensive zone.

Why not try to make these numbers better for you? It's just little different kind of transition, as transition doesn't always mean a change in the direction of the game. Transition games where you need to read the "background" that you're attacking against. Anticipation/perception -> decision -> outcome (attack - defend - loose puck)

D1 with the puck he can deal with the 1v1 but the background doesn't look too good? win space or create space?


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OK Kai, this week I will see if I can import this into Powerpoint and draw those lines I was trying to describe, then re-post... thanks!


Dean
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Kai. Great job with the diagrams and info. above.

RookieCoach

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Great discussion guys..

Tom,

What is the title of the booklet and video and do you know where I could get it? Looks like it would be a nice addition to a lot of the games already on the site.

Great diagrams on transition stats. Hearing the numbers are always one thing but seeing them can touch another chord for some, myself included.

To answer Tom's discussion question on forechecks, I think the 2-1-2 w/pinch on a wide rim would be a great forecheck to run given the numbers on turnovers and generating offense. I think running the most aggressive 4-check is the most exciting to play. I think what makes it most difficult to use is that lack of patience coaches have at times. The longer teams stick with it the less breakdowns they would see.

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Quote by: TomM

Rookie Coach and Dean.

I share my material such as the transition games that you refer to. I would like to read the discussion about them.

How have you used them? What adjustments have you made? How did the players adapt to them???? Do they seem to make a difference in the way your team plays in regulation games?

Tom , Dean,
Follow up from the conversation Tom that we had earlier today. I was just contacted from coach of the team that I have been doing practice's with. He wants to continue with the Transition games that I ran last practrice as i sad before that was an introduction for them. I suggested to him about only having Two colours and put some competition into this practice , now that they have an understanding of the games. It is a first step and hopefully it will continue. He likes what he has been seeing in the games this past weekend.
I plan on putting these stats together so I can post them at practice for the players to see. Show the importance keeping turnovers to a minimum if possible , and the importance of a good backcheck as a whole unit. NO fly by's do your job and play your role.

I heard a stat once about the percentage on a turnover at or a team failing to get the puck out within 5 ft of the blueline.
Have you guys heard of a stat like this.?
I can't seem to find it. Or maybe I think that I have heard such a stats.

RookieCoach

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