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Hockey Canada and Bauer Hockey just did a survey asking a sample of Canadian parents if they are going to put their kid's in hockey this year. 90% said NO.

The number one reason they don't choose hockey is that 'It isn't FUN.


We have over 80% of the kid's who do play Quitting by 14. Main Reason 'It isn't Fun.'

Why do we insist on using the Drill and Practice Method that hasn't been used in school systems since the early 60" and was replaced by "Whole Learning" methods.

I know USA hockey is trying to get organizations to use cross ice games, where young player touch the puck 600% more than full ice. Most European countries play cross ice league games until they are 10.

Adopting ABC concepts like 'games to teach the game,' skill SAG tournaments, moving from situation drills to Transition Games will change practices from dull and boring to enjoyable.

The players learn more and practice is 'FUN' using this method. (soccer is much better using games than hockey)

If it is Broken then Fix It.

The ABC method is proven to work all over the world. The kid's love practice, get good and what more can you ask.

Two themes of the ABC Method are.
'Enjoy the Game' and 'The Game is the Greatest Coach'.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   
Admin
Registered: 06/25/08
Posts: 3122
Location: Calgary, Canada
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let's submit drills (games,sags) that we use or would like to use, that would make the game more enjoyable. The drills should have a purpose but need to be fun.

I use 3 on 3 cross ice, or the attack defend rest 3 on 3 at every practice, the kids love both games. Lots to learn with both of these games.

The players also seem to enjoy any battle drills, great for practicing the 0 game situations.

This season I'm going to work a lot with the players stick handling, u 10, and trying to come up with a obstacle course for more enjoyment.
--------------------------------

Good ideas Peter.- Tom

   
Chatty
Registered: 06/28/12
Posts: 37
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Not sure where I found this drill, it may have been right here. This is a fun game, and has lots to offer on the coaching side. Move the net to the side boards, 3 forwards must stay on the outside of the circle, and one or two defenders must stay inside the circle. Have the rule that all 3 forwards must touch the puck before shooting, or must use one timers.

   
Chatty
Registered: 06/28/12
Posts: 37
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4 on 2 Keepaway

I like this drill because you have 6 active players at a time in one station. It very good drill to teach the players about blocking the lanes with their sticks, and always facing the puck.



   
Chatty
Registered: 06/28/12
Posts: 37
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I’m not sure what or if this game has a name, but we call it the Net Front Game, and it’s competitive. We use this drill as a station drill with 6 to 8 players. You have the players in teams of two, 6 pucks setup behind the net, one player behind the net and his/her teammate in front trying to score on the goalie. So the passer is trying to fake the goalie out and make a nice pass to the shooter, the shooter has to use a one timer to score, once the shooter shots he/she must go behind the net to be the passer and the passer becomes the shooter. Whichever team scores the most goals out of the 6 pucks win.

   
Chatty
Registered: 06/28/12
Posts: 37
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By Jack Blatherwick
Let’s Play Hockey Columnist

If you’re not on Social Security yet, you probably never heard of Howie Meeker. He is a 90-year-old legend for a half-century of hockey analysis as an author and broadcaster. Before that, he played eight years in the NHL, winning four Stanley Cups with the Toronto Maple Leafs (1947, 1948, 1949, 1951), claiming the Calder Memorial Trophy (rookie of the year) in 1947 and posting a five-goal night against the Blackhawks. Later, as a commentator, he added much more to the conversation during games than the standard advice of today’s talking heads: “Well, the Leafs need to hit more.”

Even at age 90, when Meeker speaks, hockey coaches listen. His recent interview in The Globe and Mail (reprinted online here) is loaded with thoughts every coach, parent and administrator should read – not necessarily perfect answers for every situation, but several interesting points about developing skillful, creative players.

I’ll mention only a couple of his thoughts, because you should not miss his interview online. Meeker’s opinion is that today’s hockey players are bigger, faster and stronger … but not necessarily smarter and more skillful. The first part of his premise is borne out by on- and off-ice testing we’ve done for 35 years.

Some of Meeker’s observations fit our situation in Minnesota all too well. Like most regions of North America, we suffer from a cookie-cutter youth hockey system that forces each program to structure much of their development program the same way. It is too inflexible, too expensive, too laden with rules from above, too structured on and off the ice, and too focused on adults. This is not a statement that Minnesota hockey isn’t going well; it’s simply that we could do better.

A) There are too many players on a team. With two lines on a youth team, players would have to think, not just skate hard.
Cool Adults schedule too many ‘big-stakes’ games, shifting the focus from trial-and-error development to win/loss records, trophies and the need to avoid mistakes.
C) Fifty-one percent of the rental time for every game is wasted while the puck is in the hands of the referees. There should be more ‘low-stakes’ scrimmages with non-stop action.
D) Practices with long lines and overly-structured drills without competition are not as fun as full-ice or small-ice scrimmages. Therefore the passion meter is low, and the drills don’t teach the most important skill in hockey: creative decision-making.

Ben Smith was the USA women’s coach for three Olympics. He was also an assistant coach on the men’s Olympic team in 1988, and head coach or assistant at several colleges. Ben has always believed we have too many players on a team.
“The game is meant to be played at different paces, just like soccer [like Pavel Datsyuk, I might add]. Now it is played at one pace only. Today’s players are faster, but not better. If there are four lines on a team, I want to be the center on two of them. We are developing ‘buzz-bomb’ players who do nothing more than hustle up and down the ice.”

It’s interesting that the top coaches in USA Soccer have similar thoughts (I paraphrase from two soccer articles): Our problems in international competition start at the youth level with too much structure, over-coaching in games, too much emphasis on winning and too many players on the field. There should be more competition on small fields with fewer players. That way American youngsters would have more touches and learn to make creative decisions in tight areas.

Tight areas. Smaller teams. More touches. De-emphasize winning to allow trial-and-error. Creative decisions instead of adult instructions. Sounds like a winning formula for fun and development.

A related article concerning youth hockey and long term athletic development.

http://www.getsportiq.com/2013/07/developing-athletic-players/

Another good one that Dean posted on how our brains continually change and learning is a life time journey. I read the book. It is very good.

http://www.getsportiq.com/2013/11/brain-plasticity-how-learning-changes-your-brain/


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   
Admin
Registered: 06/25/08
Posts: 3122
Location: Calgary, Canada
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Youtube coaching videos by Oldrich Jindra a Czech Coach. He does a lot of good stuff and has a passion for the game.

Oldrich Jindra put together a youtube video that lasts about 2 minutes with quick pics of 50 drills. Good stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOWGp6grvsc&feature=youtu.be

Another one with Oldrich and a kid working with pucks both handling and shooting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMzM5-z_QfU


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   
Admin
Registered: 06/25/08
Posts: 3122
Location: Calgary, Canada
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