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We have all heard of the triple threat position in basketball but at the coaching conference I just attended they talked about the hockey triple threat position. The Swedes call it "Lock and Load."

Mike Johnson gave a talk on skill development and said that when the player crosses the blueline he should be in the triple threat position with the puck at the side and not in front. From here you can pass, carry or shoot.

If you think of Gretzky he was always in the triple threat positon, Crosby the same. They face the play and instead of skating straight ahead down a wing where you only see 90 degrees over your shoulder you instead turn facing the play and have all 3 options.

Last night I had a 60 minute session with a pro player who spends time in the Eastern and American leagues and we worked on facing the play and doing most things on the forehand. It isn't natural for most players but it makes a huge difference in the options available to them with the benefit of 3 options instead of 1 or 2 and the ability to see 270 degrees instead of 90.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   
Admin
Registered: 06/25/08
Posts: 3019
Location: Calgary, Canada
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Tom,

I've noticed this skill become more important with the appropriately officiated game-ie. no clutching and grabbing.

The gifted player tends to face-up and make moves as opposed to cycling.

At our VGT camp this summer we'll be asking the players to perform evasive moves using only the forehand. This requires transitional skating maneuvers--Mohawks, T-pushes, shuffles, slides, etc.

BTW: Are you watching the World Cup? A lot of great tactics that can be modified for Hockey.

Cheers,

Paulie

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I had always assumed that only the truly gifted were capable playing 'sideways'. For sure, I couldn't do it. This concept is going to lead to some interesting drills & SAG's. If anyone has anything to share on this topic I will consume it as fast as you can post it.

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Pops, it would be nice if all players could do the heel to heel slide like Crosby but most can't and it isn't necessary. The key is to develop solid playing habits. 3 of the most important habits are:

1. Always face the play, turn towards the play and be in the ready position for the playing role you are in.

2. When you get the puck either you move or the puck moves, then you move.

3. Carry the puck in the triple threat position as much as possible.

You can have them practice all of these things with modified rules in game situations.
1. Play a game with the rule that everyone always faces the puck. I introduce it by skating around the rink with the puck and the players are scattered alll over skating and facing me all the time. This in HOCKEY SKATING.
2. Game with the rule that you must take at least 3 hard strides before you can pass or shoot the puck. Add the rule that gols only count on give and go plays to emphasis pass and get open.
3. Game with the rule that only forehand passes are allowed. This causes the player to do many pivots, tight turns, cut backs, etc. They will automatically be in the triple threat position and now see the ice better and always have the 3 choices.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   
Admin
Registered: 06/25/08
Posts: 3019
Location: Calgary, Canada
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Thank you, Tom. I am about to create a couple of SAG's for this seasons play book and have entitled the page as "Triple Threat, Double Move, Single Thought". It remains a mystery to me as to why you are not coaching professionally. Anyway, many thanks for this and for yesterdays help with the Hard Trap. I contrasted the pursuit trap with the containment version and called that one 'Half Bored High or Half Board Pressure." By the way, Happy Fathers Day !

   
Chatty
Registered: 05/28/09
Posts: 42
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This brings up an observation/question I have concerning tight turns with the puck: I believe I've read here and other places that, when performing a tight turn with the puck on the forehand side (i.e., turning left for a right-handed shooter), the top hand should move across the body and under the other arm. The USA Hockey Skills and Drills DVD teaches that, instead, the bottom hand should slide down the shaft so the player is in a shooting/passing position. This approach seems more consistent with the 3x threat position, no?

   
Junior
Registered: 03/30/10
Posts: 34
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The best players that I have watched making those type turns were Naslund and Kurri. Both of them widen their stance and drop their top hand down below their hips - with or without the puck. You can release quicker and you can certainly receive the puck more cleanly when you do so. I was never a big fan of crossing the top hand over, those guys always seemed easy to pressure and easy to body off the puck.

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I am in a hotel room in Coeur D'Alene, Idaho. We were going to stay in Glacier National Park but it was raining so bad that we drove all the way here and are staying an extra day.

I think that the hands crossed over on a tight turn was taught by almost everyone for about 20 years. I know I personally never held my stick like that but I taught it. I no longer teach to cross over but to lower the bottom hand while the top hand is near your back pocket. This way you are in a power position, i.e. the triple threat position to carry, pass or shoot.

Crossing the hands is great for going around pylons but not practical in game situations.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   
Admin
Registered: 06/25/08
Posts: 3019
Location: Calgary, Canada
8 posts :: Page 1 of 1