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I work with a player who is playing minor pro and played NCAA div 1 for 4 years. We had a session tonight and here is what we did. He wanted to focus on stick handling.

We followed the principles of nervous system overload and big moves with good fakes.

-arond the ice handling a hockey ball, racquet ball and tennis ball at the same time. After one lap add a puck and take away the hockey ball, next add another puck and take away the tennis ball, next three pucks.

- around the ice with big moves carrying a racquet ball.
- with a puck big moves, skate left and puck right, then right and puck left powering away from the puck as far as possible.
- skate aroung the ice with the puck in the skates, toes out and the puck back and forth.
- add another puck so one in the skates and one with the stick.
- toes in and puck back and forth while skating backwards then after a lap add another puck, so one with the skates and the other with the stick.

- 3 lanes, down the side, thru middle and down the other side.
- toe drag practice around each dot. Fake inside and toe drag sliding backward. Repeat but with a back toe drag..Come back thru the middle lane doing 2 forehand and 2 backhand tight turns.
- fake a slap shot one lap
- fake slap shot, push the puck to forehand side
- repeat but pull puck across the body on forehand.
- repeat sequence but start with a back hand fake shot, then next lap add across the body to the forehand.

- Triple threat position. Get the puck on the forehand practice. To do this we passed really hard to each other skating around and pivoting in the zone but we had to receive the pass and then get the puck on the side in the triple threat positon with as little stick handling as possible. All passes had to be preceeded by a fake one way and then a pass.

- In a circle practice moves all around the body, thru the legs, pivots etc..

- practice head and shoulder fakes from the triple threat positon; skate around making hard moves that will make the defender staighten the knees or start to turn one way.

- Taylor Hall move down the backhand side, get the D to reach and turn inside while passing the puck to yourself with the back of the blade thru the legs, cut in and shoot.

It was a 60 minute session and was productive.


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Admin
Registered: 06/25/08
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Did that session wear you out, Tom? I got tired just from reading about it. On a serious note, two puck drills may be appropriate for 1st year college players and I am adding that idea to our Playbook. The Triple Threat concepts compliment your prior post on that subject - especially the part about getting into Triple Threat position quickly. Setting yourself up for Triple Threat in stages defeats the purpose. Too many touches and the element of surprise is almost gone - and the D has had their 2-3 seconds to transition. I know this is asking a lot, but if there if any video on such a workout...that would be a great learning resource for anyone. Thanks again, Tom, for all that you do to help us.

   
Chatty
Registered: 05/28/09
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Pops various videos from the puck handling video section with Jim or from our skills camp and some from my college women have many of the exercises I did last night.


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We had another session last night and repeated the warm up with the 3 balls adding a puck and taking away the ball, then big moves with the puck around and thru the body and off all the skate edges and back to the stick.

I brought 4 small nets and we added toe drags into the nets and out with the nets lined up down the ice. Then we did some variable goal training with moves around the net finishing with a shot. I passed hard and he made a move and quick shot, then another putck another move around a net and then a thrid.

We then worked on walk outs from below the goal line with a power move out protecting the puck and sliding backwards and hanging the puck over the goalies shoulder. We did this from both sides. That was pretty tiring so we saucer passes across the ice for recovery and finished with the 4 nets around the middle circle and I passed while he weaved in and out of the nets always passing on the forehand. I moved around so he had to find me.

Good session with lots of reps.


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Tom,
I really like the skill sets involved here. Any suggestions as to how you would incorporate some of these ideas into a practice when there are 17 other skaters on the ice? Would you use 4 nets and have all wingers involved...while the D Men are using the other half of the sheet?

PS I can not for the life of me find the file that addresses breakouts against various forechecks. There were flow diagrams to use against the 2-1-2, the 1-2-2, the Torpedo, etc. Please help..

   
Chatty
Registered: 05/28/09
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Pops in a team practice you can have them leave from one end in 3 or 4 lines and finish with a shot as in the Jursinov video. With a whole team there I would have them go down one side with front toe drags around the dot, finish with a shot, toe drags into the 4 nets down the middle and shoot, then down the far side with back toe drags and just vary the tasks after everyone has gone thru a few times.

In my camps coming up later in the month we will do all these things and incorporate drills and games where they have to use the skills under pressure plus when we practice with multiple balls and pucks we will all move to one end and they will have to develop split vision to avoid collision (good rhyme). To tell the truth it is easier to work on the skills with larger groups than with only one player.

Come on the ice with me in Jasper July 18 and you can help out (no pay). My daughter and 2 grandchildren and I are staying in a Jasper campground but there is a dorm in the arena, where Gaston and his girlfriend Beata supervise. I am also giving a coaching seminar in Jasper and may be working with a midget team as well.

The Jasper camp is neat because there are about 24 players on the ice all at once ages 6-16 both girls and boys. Some stay at the dorm, some at campgrounds and hotels and the locals of course at home. They have 3 ice times a day and alternate between 2 skating and a hockey one day and visa versa the next each day ends with plyo's. Gaston also has a figure skating group there who also skate 3 times a day. They end up having 13 ice times The meals at the rink are incredible. On Wednesday morning everyone goes white water rafting. Best camp I have every been associated with. The older kid's help the younger ones and it is a great atmosphere and very casual. (Gaston was Swiss skating champion, has a doctorate in body mechanics and has coached Olympic teams in figure skating and speed skating (fitness). I have yet to see a better skating coach.

I went to the search function at the top right hand corner of the page and typed in breakout and got http://hockeycoachingabcs.com/filemgmt/index.php?id=39 which is what I think you are looking for. First I typed in breakouts and it didn't find this link. Also Jursinov is can be spelled Yursinov.


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Tom
The first thing we do as soon as we jump on the ice is to form pairs, each guy with his own puck, and skate around playing 'double catch' If I can pair up regular D-Men, we do so. Sometimes I give each guy two pucks, one for the stick, the other for the skates. This drill, with the toe drags, etc. would fit in well as a seamless progression. Many thanks.
As for the Mike Smith breakouts, that is exactly what I was looking for. I was noodling around with developing PK rotations vs the Umbrella, vs the Funnel, vs the Center Down Low, etc. and wondered if the guy coming out of the box can be used as more than panicked D-Zone coverage or a sneaky Stretch Man. Pretty theoretical, I know, but....
As for Jasper, I hope you and your family have a great time. It does serve to remind me of how much I detest this 45 hour a week sales job and how alive I feel as soon as I hit the parking lot down at the rink.

   
Chatty
Registered: 05/28/09
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Pops, I think the player who just finished sitting in the penalty box has 3 options.
1. If the puck has been iced then either join the play or get to the players bench so the new player can get on with his linemates. This is more dificult the farther the box is from the bench.
2. If his team has the puck in the dzone then get open for a stretch pass.
3.If they have good control then hustle and become F1 low in the dzone because that is who is missing in most pk schemes. If a really aggressive pk is being used it may be the F3 position that needs to be covered.

I like nervous system overload activities like the two puck passing etc. to challenge the players brain and their body at the start of practice.. Even a game like baggo at each end where they only have the puck for 1" and can only shoot one timers.

Too bad you have no time for the Jasper camp.


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We reversed the order of nervous system overload.
3 pucks at once, then 2 and a hockey ball, 1 and a hockey and tennis ball, then the 3 balls only.

Rythm with the puck in the feet forward around the rink then one puck in the feet and the other with the stick. Same thing backward, this is really hard, my son is the only one that can do this without much problem.

Pucks lined up on both sides of the blueline about a yard away and skate down the line with big moves reaching around each puck, then skate around the pucks and keep puck on top of the blue line, finish stickhandling thru about 15 pucks about 2' apart across the ice.

We did this circuit and added skating on one leg only while weaving the skate and puck thru the line of pucks.

Added some variable goal training and had to cut around nets with big moves after the agility big moves circuit. I focused on change of pace and head and shoulder fakes.

Then I moved the 4 small nets into various places and he worked on various kinds of fakes around the nets finishing with a shot. I put a pad the height of the goalie pad in front of the net. i.e. fake shot with a pivot, front and back toe drags. I added a give and go with me before the last obstacle.

Shooting; 3 shots in quick sequence but the 4 nets were in front of the goal between the top of the circle and hash. He had to get the shot on net but not hit any nets. I pass from the goal line really hard and he leaves from the red line. Gets first puck near blue, shoots and another puck is on the way, shoots and then hard to the net for a close in one timer.

Finished off where I fed him one timer passes with the nets flat on the ice to simulate a shot blocker in front. He had to hit the net over the small nets.


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The idea of placing the smaller nets as obstacles to the actual net is an interesting scoring drill. That might also be used as a cool down drill at the end of practice instead of penalty shots. There are a number of variations that could be used ie shooting across your body while on the move, one timers, shot off a give and go, etc.
Tom, When you use the term 'big moves' does that refer to a change of direction after it seems that the puck carrier has already committed to going the other way? Again, many thanks for some very interesting idea..

   
Chatty
Registered: 05/28/09
Posts: 42
10 posts :: Page 1 of 1