By: TomM (offline)  Sunday, January 16 2011 @ 01:36 PM GMT  

NHL Pre-season Skill and Conditioning Practice

This is the practice that Dean Holden did with the NHL players who live in Calgary to prepare them for training camp. There are a lot of quick paced drills and it ends with a transtion game. The pdf has the diagrams, descriptions and links to the videos of each activity.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
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TomM



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By: TomM (offline)  Sunday, January 16 2011 @ 03:14 PM GMT  

DT100 Total Hockey 1-1 to 3-2

I was just looking at the transition game videos and there is one where I had my college women go through the sequence of a continuous 1-1 to 3 on 2 with active support. I think it is a great way to create realistic situations to practice both team offense and defense. To do a 3 on 2 you need at least 12 F and 8 D. A 2-2 requires 8 D and 8 F's. A 2 on 1 needs 4 D and 8 F's. In college you usually have enough players to do the whole game.

The beauty of this rotation is that the coach is free to focus on technique or team play because the game runs itself.

If you want to practice the forecheck and fast breakout require that the offensive team dump the puck in. Also add regroups in the neutral zone.

This game is an advanced edition of the Erkka because it has active and not passive support. So the new defensive players coming into the zone must cover the right player and the attackers can use the points and pointmen join the play.

I consider this to be the natural progression from situation drills of 1-1 to 3-2 as well as the most effective way to practice team play in a realistic situation.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090726102316489


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By: TomM (offline)  Monday, January 17 2011 @ 01:39 PM GMT  

D2 Cross Ice Game – Sweden

Key Points:
Face the puck and give good support. Use nets, tires, small nets, the line on the boards etc., for a goal.

Description:
Play a cross ice game to warm up. Encourage the players to want the puck and try moves to create space for themselves.

Anders Ottosson is a development coach in Sweden. He is running a skills practice for 12 year old players in Stockholm.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?s=20100414094539964


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By: TomM (offline)  Tuesday, January 18 2011 @ 03:43 PM GMT  

Swedish U13 Practice

I took my college women's team to Scandanavia for some games and while in Stockholm Anders Ottossom came to meet me and was asked by some coaches there to run a practice for them. I took a video of it. Anders Ottosson is a development coach for the Swedish Federation and also works with their women's National Team.

This practice is a great model for youth practice. It has a theme which is puck handling and passing. He warms up with a cross ice game, they do skill drills and a lesson, play another cross ice game to use the skills in a realistic sitution and then play a transition game to do the skills full ice.

So he isn't practicing to teach drills but instead using drills and games as tools to practice how to PLAY hockey.


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By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, January 19 2011 @ 02:00 PM GMT  

Only do this game if you are brave enough to see how good your team actually is.

I did this game at practice with both my youth skills group and my women's team. To do this game effectively the players must have both GOOD SKILLS and GOOD HABITS. Most players learn by doing drills where you work on only one game playing role at a time. You pass and watch, instead of passing and getting open (you have changed roles from 1-with the puck to 2-puck support). On defense the puck moves quickly so the player who had the puck now is trying to get open and you must cover him.

Good habits like talking, giving a target, stick on the ice, sticks in the lanes, deciding between giving a flat or a saucer pass, skating hard to open ice when you get the puck, making the easy play, looking around before you get the puck, taking passes cleanly without a bobble, skating away from pressure; on and on.

You will see your players taking too long switching between roles and if they are really good at this game then they are REALLY GOOD PLAYERS. (at elite levels the puck carrier has the puck an average of 2.5 seconds, the team is in possession 4.5 seconds and then change roles from loose puck -30% of the time, on offense as either puck carrier or support 35% of the time and on defense either checking the puck or covering someone 35% of the time. The game is very similar to tennis changing from offense to defense about 130-150 times a game.

That is why games like this are so important to use. The brain and the body must both be involved.

-----------------------------------------------------

D100 Two Second Game

Key Points:
Players must switch right away from offense to defense to loose puck and constantly change roles from, 1-puck carrier, 2-puck support, 3-check puck carrier, 4-cover away from the puck.

Description:
1. Play a full ice game of 3-3, 4-3, 4-4, 5-4, 5-5, 6-5 with the extra players on the bench.
2. Play 45" shifts and pass back to your goalie when the coach whistles for a change.
3. Players can only have the puck for 2" and must make a play, gain a zone or shoot.
4. Possession from first touching the puck for over 2" leave the puck for the other team.
5. Encourage talking, facing the puck, always give a target.

*Don't blow the whistle if they have started shooting. Start time when the goalie gets puck. Keep score and losing or winning have a consequence.


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By: TomM (offline)  Thursday, January 20 2011 @ 04:12 PM GMT  

DT Transition Game Presentation

Key Points:
In a hockey game players are in constant transition from offense to defense to loose puck situations. On offense the player either has the puck or is supporting the puck carrier. On defense the player is either checking the puck carrier, double teaming or supporting away from the puck. Constant decisions have to be made concerning loose puck situations which happen about 30% of the time in a hockey game.
Transition games are the natural progression from game situation drills of 1-1 to 3-2. They simulate a real game situation because the player must go from offense to defense or from defense to offense and also battle for loose pucks.

Description:
Transition games only use ONE puck and there are no whistles during the play. This creates realistic situations that mimic the game. The games run themselves so the coach is free to isolate one individual or team play skill to focus on. Instead of stopping the game to give instruction the coach can talk with resting players to correct or compliment their performance.
This video gives an introduction to transition games. It begins with college women playing a full ice back checking game and progresses to a team of 85 born players when they were 12 (in the group is Ryan Duncan a Hobey Baker award winner and future NH currently Europena proL, Mason Raymond NHL, Jeremy Colliton NHL, Aaron Lee European pro while the remaining players made at least Jr. A and many played NCAA and CIS.)
It then moves to Juhani Wahlsten (IIHF Hall of Fame Finnish Coach) and Vladimir Jusinov (IIHF Hall of Fame Russian coach, who are both former Olympic Team players) giving an on ice demonstration to coaches at a symposium in Europe.
Hockey Canada had Erkka Westerlund (Finnish pro coach, Olympic silver medal coach and former head of hockey development) prepare a video and book on Transition. It is worth ordering from them.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090725194239373 is the video link.






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By: TomM (offline)  Friday, January 21 2011 @ 01:37 PM GMT  

NHL Players Training in Sweden

This is a Swedish show about some NHL players going to Sweden to train. There are a few interviews that are in english but the video shows the Swedes technique training and isolates the important skills.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110121071925648

The picture is from the 2005 World Championships in Austria. We were sitting by the players bench beside the Swedish Team. I have attached a pdf with diagrams from Joachim Holst of Sweden on puck handling skills.


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By: TomM (offline)  Monday, January 24 2011 @ 01:17 PM GMT  

U20 Major Junior Practice

This is a pdf of with the diagrams and links to video of a Major Junior practice. It starts with passing and shooting then moves to the 2-1 with a regroup and then team play practicing the even strength forecheck and breakout and the pplay reads on a breakout.

B600 1-2-3 F’s Regroup with Both D

C3, 2-1 with Regroup

T2-4 D100 Breakout and Forecheck

T2 D100 Controlled Breakout Reads


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By: TomM (offline)  Tuesday, January 25 2011 @ 03:41 PM GMT  

I have posted a pdf with all of the C2 drills and flow drills from the Daily Drills section. These drills are mostly for more advanced players and work on situations from a 1-1 to a 5-5. It is an easier way to find the drills than searching thru the 6 Daily Drills sections.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/filemgmt/index.php?id=50 is the linkto the pdf of the drills that I have also posted in the files section of this site.


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By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, January 26 2011 @ 01:27 PM GMT  

C3 Formation has the players lined up along the boards on both sides.

They are full ice drills to practice game play situations. The pdf is attached and has diagrams, descriptions and most have video links.


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By: TomM (offline)  Thursday, January 27 2011 @ 04:24 PM GMT  

A Formation - Drills and Practices - Ind. Skills and Warm-up

In the A formation is an efficient way for beginning players to learn skills like skating, puck handling, passing while moving. At more advanced level the same drills are used for warm-up.

This pdf has diagrams with descriptions and many have video examples. There are also some model practices for beginners and drills from Sweden for young players.


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By: TomM (offline)  Friday, January 28 2011 @ 01:56 PM GMT  

B Formation Drills

These drills are from the B practice formations. Individual offensive and defensive technique, partner practice and offensive and defensive team play play are practiced.

These drills are used in youth hockey to teach the skills and in more advanced hockey for review and practicing doing skills at full speed. There are about 120 drills posted. All have diagrams and most have videoes.

It took hundreds of hours to put this together; There are drills from almost every hockey nation and many show international coaches running the drills.

B1-shooting skills
B2-shooting
B3-individual skills practice lined up opposite each other.
B4-full ice skills and partner practice from a line up in the middle.
B5-individual and team play from the middle circle.
B500-partner skills
B6-drills starting in the corners, these can be half or full ice.
B600-players start from the blue line on each side and do passing and game situations in the neutral zone finishing with shots.
B7-Face-off practice.


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By: TomM (offline)  Saturday, January 29 2011 @ 01:51 PM GMT  

D Games to Teach the Game

The core of the entire ABC coaching method is using GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME.

Hockey is a GAME and it is critical to practice the important individual and team skills that players learn in the A-B and C drills. These drills isolate individual or team play situations that can be used to be successful in regular games vs an opponent. If we just teach drills that teach the What and How of a skill and never put the skills into game situations where the player must decide Why, When and Where the skills are effective then we only produce players who have skill with no context to use them in.

So small area and full ice games in practice are a critical step if we want to develop creative players who are independent decision makers.

This pdf gives the rational from the ABC's program and many full ice and SAG games that can be played to "Learn the Game."

New games that I have posted on this site are included with the original material.

This is the most important posting I have made on this site.


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By: hockeygod (offline)  Tuesday, February 01 2011 @ 07:48 PM GMT  

"If we just teach drills that teach the What and How of a skill and never put the skills into game situations where the player must decide Why, When and Where the skills are effective then we only produce players who have skill with no context to use them in.

So small area and full ice games in practice are a critical step if we want to develop creative players who are independent decision makers.

...This is the most important posting I have made on this site."

-----

Tom, these words are 100% TRUE! I have been using many of the games from the D section of the book on and off-ice at the Junior and Senior High levels with great success. ....We as teacher / coaches / facilitators merely provide the environment of guided discovery.

This is in direct opposition to the dictatorial-style coach who thinks that he has to always bark out the answers to the kids (someone who I once was and have been evolving from over the past many years!) These coaches think that they must seem to be 'in charge' and the best way is to be loud and opinionated.

It takes a skilled and patient teacher / coach to craft the environment AND step back to tell them nothing but the parameters of the game... be patient and let the players figure it out. (One might have to interject if they aren't upholding the rules of the game.) This speaks to the development of creativity and independent decision makers - it is awesome to allow kids come up with novel solutions to the same problem; as well, over time it makes you seem like a more successful coach as the kids actively problem-solve under game conditions.

I see you have added many more games at the end of this book... page 79 to 128. Nice work! Thanks for putting these into one place. Next time we meet, I will buy you a beer!


Dean
M.Ed (Coaching)
Ch.P.C. (Chartered Professional Coach)
Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   

hockeygod



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By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, February 02 2011 @ 01:59 PM GMT  

Transition Games: The Critical Component that is Missing in Most Practices

Transition is the key to successful hockey. Going from game situations Offense to Defense to Loose Puck and game playing roles 1-puck carrier, 2-supporting puck carrier on offense and 3-checking the puck carrier, 4-covering players away from the puck quickly and with good habits separates good players from the average and good teams from lesser teams.

All games in practice work on transition but specific transition games can isolate individual or team play skills that are being practiced in situation drills (1-1, 2-1, etc.)

Transition games are realistic because only ONE puck is used. Whistles are not used or may be used to time playing segments. The players must COMPLET plays, i.e. on a 1-1 drill the players go back to the line up after a rush which is not very game like. In a transtion game of 1-1 the offensive player fights for the rebound and continues to try and score, the defensive player must regain the puck and make a breakout pass and the puck must clear the zone before he returns to the line up.

Team play is practiced when the new players joining the situation are actice and must assume their proper support positioning or coverage on both offense and defense.

The coach is free to talk with players during the resting phase of transition games because the players change on their own.

I have included the transtion section of the Hockey Coaching ABC's book plus additional transition games, or else the same games with video examples.

My view of a good practice would be like this.

A-nervous system oveload with individual or partner drills or a game with multiple pucks or specific tasks.

B-skill warm up while goalies crease skate etc.

B-shooting drills that require passing and good habits. Individual and partner skills.

C-drills to work on the goal of the practice. Either individual or team skills.

D-games with modified rules to work on these goals.

DT-transition games that isolate the skills.

E-shootout or contest to end the practice.


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By: TomM (offline)  Saturday, February 05 2011 @ 06:05 PM GMT  

DT400 1-1, 2-2, Support-Attack-Defend

Key Points:
Defender play a tight gap and backckhecker back pressure the puck carrier to create a defensive 2 on1. Fight for rebounds. Defender tie up the stick of the attacker and attacker fight to keep stick free to shoot. Do from both sides of the ice.

Description
1. Number 1 attack vs number 2 on both sides of the ice.

2. Number 3 support defender number 2 from the lineup.

3. Number 2 breakout with number 3.

4. Number 3 skate with the puck to either the red line or far blue line and then turn back and attack vs number 2.

5. Continue with number 3 attacking number 2 and getting support from numbe 4 at the front of the line.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090726102315873


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By: TomM (offline)  Saturday, February 05 2011 @ 06:35 PM GMT  

DT400 Low Battles With a Pass to the Point 1-1 to 3-3

Key Points:
Transition happens when the defending team passes to their team mate at the point. The players must go from offense to defense when the puck is passed to the point and give support on both offense and defense.

Description:
1. Players line up behind the blueline in teams.

2. Coach shoots the puck in and any number from1 to 3 players on each team battle for possession.

3. The team that gains possession of the puck is on offense and tries to score.

4. The defending team must pass to their player at the point to be on offense.

5. Player at the point must shoot or pass within one second. He can’t skate in and shoot.

6. Play shifts of 30” and pass to the coach and hustle outside the blue line on the coaches whistle.

7. The coach dumps a new puck in for the next group.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090726093549750


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By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, February 09 2011 @ 02:05 PM GMT  

This is a variation of a previously posted transition game to show how you can use multiple nets.
-------------------------------------------

DT400 Attack-Defend-Breakout with Three Nets 1-1 to 2-2

Key Points:
Attacker make quick moves and go to the net. Defender play a tight gap and stay on the defensive side always. Backchecker come hard to create a defensive 2-1 and get open for a breakout pass. Goalie fight to find the puck if there is a screen.

Description:
This is a half or 2/3 ice transition game. It can be played 1-1 or 2-1 or 2-2. The defender gets support from the line in the nzone when the puck crosses the blueline. In this example there are 2 games at one end and one game at the other. It is a college women tryout and there are 3 goalies.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=2009072609354752


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By: TomM (offline)  Thursday, February 10 2011 @ 05:27 PM GMT  

I just had a skills practice with my school group. There are two definite levels in the group and I have to modify drills or make up new ones where the better players shoot on the experienced goalie and the lower group shoot on the beginning goalie. Also the games need to happen between players with similar skills. So it is basically running two practices at one time. Some things can be done together but most must be separated. I am sure many coaches have the same situation so I will post one flow passing drill and two half ice transition games in the next few days. First the drill.

The transition games both require the breakout skill of the quick up drill.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

B600 2-0 Quick Ups

Key Points:
Have good habits with the shooter looking for a rebound. New attacker on the puck side should face the passer and player on the weak side cut across the ice and give a target.
Move the puck up ice quickly and call for passes.

Description:
1. #1 and 2 attack 2-0.
2. # 3 and 4 follow the attack up ice.
3. Shooter follow shot for rebound,
4. Other attacker get a new puck and pass to 3 or 4.
5. Repeat other way with shooter following the shot and the other attacker passing to 5 or 6.
6. Continue this flow.


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By: hockeygod (offline)  Thursday, February 10 2011 @ 08:43 PM GMT  

"I just had a skills practice with my school group. There are two definite levels in the group and I have to modify drills or make up new ones where the better players shoot on the experienced goalie and the lower group shoot on the beginning goalie. Also the games need to happen between players with similar skills. So it is basically running two practices at one time. Some things can be done together but most must be separated. I am sure many coaches have the same situation so I will post one flow passing drill and two half ice transition games in the next few days." - Tom -


Tom, I have the same problem in the junior high classes I teach (one Grade 7 (30 kids), one Grade 8 (15 kids), one Grade 9 (15 kids) and a mixed class of Grades 7-9 (30 kids).) What I have done lately is break them into small groups of similar skill level (IE: 6-8 similar kids, then have them play against each other 1 vs 1 or 2 vs 2 or 3 vs 3 or 4 vs 4 - I balance the groups) and do the same thing with the other kids. This way they can compete against a similar skill category so the don't get hammered or don't get bored. I can use half-ice or cross-ice or full-ice drills and organize the 'shifts' so that the similar level kids play against their own level... change every 45-60 seconds... and with a total of 3 groups on each team, the activity level is good and the W:R ratio is similar to running three sets of lines.

The groups are always slightly in flux depending on who doesn't show up / sick, etc., so some daily juggling might be necessary. I will move the odd kid up or down a group based on effort / lack of effort. This is a good motivator. Kind of like a relegation system!

I try to use transition drills / games wherever possible; especially when I have a skill difference in goalies. IE: If team A scores on the weak goalie, now they have to score on the good goalie (and vice versa). Or I set time limits on how long the game runs... one team spends five minutes shooting on the good goalie; then switch directions (goalies) for the same time. Keep a cumulative score to decide the winner at the end of the time limit. This helps level the playing field.

So far, I have found this to be the best way to help overcome the wide disparity in skills at the junior high level. (My high school groups are real homogeneous so far as skill levels; so no problems there!)
---------------------------------------
Dean, it is a constant challenge for coaches who organize practices for groups with muliple ages and skill levels. This school only has one group so 3 grades are combined. A camp I did in December had 29 players, boy's and girl's ranging from ages 6 to 16 and ability midget AAA to beginner. Zero goalies. You need to be able to organize and reorganize to accomplish the theme of the practice. If it was easy then it wouldn't be fun.
I am changing my trip plans and going to Finland from Vienna instead of the symposium. Juuso wants me to meet him in Turku.
So Vienna, Turku, Salzburg and back to Calgary. I couldn't make changes to the start or end of my original flight.



Dean
M.Ed (Coaching)
Ch.P.C. (Chartered Professional Coach)
Game Intelligence Training

"Great education depends on great teaching."

   

hockeygod



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Posts: 2063
By: TomM (offline)  Friday, February 11 2011 @ 01:21 PM GMT  

We progressed into a half ice transition game at each end from the Quick Up drill. The advanced group had 6 skaters and the lower group had 7 skaters.Goalie at each end.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
DT400 - 2 on 2 Passive Support 6 Players

Key Points:
Players support from the top of the slot as if they are wingers and can steal the puck if the attackers go too high. Strong side support be on the boards and facing the passer and weak side cut across the ice giving a target
Create offensive 2 on 1's.

Description:
A. 1 and 2 attack vs 3 and 4.
B. 3 and 4 defend.
C. 5 and 6 follow and support from top of circles.
D. On a goal, frozen puck or transition 3 or 4 pass to 5 or 6.
E. 3 and 4 support defensive 1 and 2 from the top of the circles.
F. Option A. Repeat this rotation if only 6 players.
G. Option B. 7 and 8 support defense and 3 and 4 would rest. With 8 or more players have two teams.


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By: TomM (offline)  Saturday, February 12 2011 @ 01:23 PM GMT  

With the same group I rotated who the first 2 attacked against so they were attacking and defending different players. We did this last game which gave point support to the attackers. Lots of low play and fighting for net presence.
Practice began with 10 min. of individual skill work where the players chose what they wanted to work on. After the drills and transition games we played rebound and finished with a change on the go shootout race.

--------------------------------------------------------------

DT400 2 on 2 Support from Point 6 Players

Key Points:
Attackers create 2 on 1's, get open, screen, give target. Defenders stay D side, box out and tie up sticks on rebounds.
Point players can't jump in and only get one second with the puck and can only make one D to D pass.

Description:
A. 1 and 2 attack vs 3 and 4.
B. 5 and 6 support attackers from point.
C. 5 and 6 can make one pass and only have the puck one second.
D. On goal, frozen puck or transition 3 and 4 regroup thru middle dot and attack vs 5 and 6.
E. Option A. 1 and 2 support attack from the point.
F. Option B. 7 and 8 support and 1 and 2 rest.


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By: TomM (offline)  Tuesday, February 15 2011 @ 07:45 PM GMT  

E1 10 Puck 1-0 and 2-0 Shootout

Key Points:
Allow only one or maybe two passes before shooting. Place 10 pucks on the blue line or
less if you don't have much time.

Description:
1. Players are on the bench and can't leave until the scorers get within one stick length
of the gate.
2. Race back to the bench hard to simulate changing on the fly.
3. Next two players go and pick up another puck from he blue line.
4. Goalie can shoot the puck away but keep it in the zone.
5. Losing team do something like skate or push ups for each goal they lose by.
6. In the 1-0 game only allow 1 to 3 tries and if they don't score put the puck back on the blue line and race to the bench.
7. In the 2-0 game also play the variation that each player must score one goal. You can also require a certain kind of shot, tip in, rebound etc. for one or two of the goals.


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By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, February 16 2011 @ 01:32 PM GMT  

E1 Shootout Contest Below the Goal Line

Key Points:
Players must walk out from below the goal line with power moves. Protect the puck and shoot high on butterfly goalies, to the far post on stand ups or through the legs on either style. Another option on a wrap around is to jam it inside the near post before the goalie gets across the net.

Description:
1. Players line up in each corner. The coach could put a glove or cone to mark where they can walk out.
2. Players carry the puck and either walk out or wrap around to score.
3. Alternate corners.
4. The player gets 30” to score 4 goals.
5. Players who don’t score 4 goals must skate down and back.
6. If the goalie allows a certain number of players to score 4 goals then he skates down and back at the end of the contest.
7. Alternative is to go one player at a time from alternate corners and keep score.


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By: TomM (offline)  Thursday, February 17 2011 @ 03:38 PM GMT  

E1 Shootout Race 1

Key Points
Players must have one skate on the dot at the start. No hooking or tripping. Skate to get D side and get the puck. *This is a great contest for puck protection, battling, scoring and a good anaerobic conditioning exercise. Keep score with one colour vs the other.


Description
1. Players are lined up behind the face of dots at each end.
2. A player from each team race for the puck which the coach puts on the middle dot.
3. Protect the puck and try to score vs backchecking opponent.
4. Another puck on the dot and repeat the other way.

hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723063235226


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By: Anonymous: DMan ()  Thursday, February 17 2011 @ 05:09 PM GMT  

Thanks Tom,

Here's one for the collection. We use it 2 v 0 more than 1 v 0. I have a few more that I just learned...will put them into diagrams soon and submit them.

-------------------------------------------------

E1 - 10 Puck Shootout Relay:

-Coaches have 10 pucks each

-Players skate around opposite net and come back to goal nearest their line.

-Both sides go at same time

-Players shoot, rebound, then pass to their line.

-Shots that miss net must be retrieved.

-New pucks handed out only after a goal

-First team to score 10 goals wins

-Can also be done 2 v 0

Dave
----------------------------
Dave, that is a good one and I will use it. Thanks for contributing.

By: TomM (offline)  Friday, February 18 2011 @ 03:29 PM GMT  

T Teaching the Game on Ice

I have gone through the posting about how to teach the various playing roles during practice. This pdf combines the four game playing roles and various articles about what is important to coach and how to run effective teaching practices.

T is the code for on ice activities with a lot of instruction.

T1 - individual offensive skills.

T2 - team offensive skills.

T3 - individual defensive skills.

T4 - team defensive skills.

There are also some articles about evaluating play and how to organize the ice as well as drills and games from pro practices.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2840
By: Anonymous: DMan ()  Friday, February 18 2011 @ 04:45 PM GMT  

Here's another contest for end of practice. This one gets quite chaotic if you have a lot of players, and it's a lot of fun.
-----------------------------------------

5 Puck Full Ice Race:

-Players take push-up position facing red line.
-Coach puts 5 pucks across red line
-On whistle teams race to score goals at opposite end
-First team to score 3 wins
-Players can defend own net too
-Only one shot at a time on goalie
-Goalie must be ready

--------------------------------------
Dave that is another good one. Last week I did a multi puck game and didn't remind them about only one shot at a time assuming they remembered that rule. They didn't. So it is important to remind them.

By: Anonymous: DMan ()  Saturday, February 19 2011 @ 09:08 PM GMT  

2 v 0 Scoring Game:

-X1 & X2 race against 01 & 02 to score 2 goals
-After scoring the first, return to own line to get 2nd puck & regroup
-After scoring 2nd, sprint back across red line in direction of original line
-1st team to cross red line with 2 goals wins point

By: Anonymous: DMan ()  Saturday, February 19 2011 @ 09:10 PM GMT  

Full Ice 2 v 0 Scoring Game:

-Play starts on whistle, both sides going at same time

-X1 & X2 race to score 2 goals vs O1 & O2

-After 1st goal X1 & X2 retrieve puck from far blue

-Both players must cross red line on regroup

-After 2nd goal players sprint back to cross red line

-First side to cross red line with 2 goals gets point

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