By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, September 12 2012 @ 03:13 PM GMT (Read 16359 times)  

I am going to focus on how to use games to teach the game over the next while. There has been a movement in places like the USA to play cross ice like they do in most parts of Europe. Sometimes it seems like it is simply playing games for the sake of playing games. That isn't a bad idea but games can be a very effective tool for practicing specific hockey skills for individual, team and game understanding.

The first part is to have an understanding how games can be used to: TEACH THE GAME

It would be good if other coaches contribute ideas.
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Understanding the Game

SMALL AND MODIFIED GAMES:
A TOOL TO LEARN TO PLAY ICE HOCKEY

The small games method signifies an alternative approach to the traditional way of running a class or practice in goal centered games. The teaching style is a tool in learning to play. This method is based on the traditional and natural methods of pick-up games and shinny. Lining players up is avoided, and the different modified games take care of teaching the rules and skills of the sport. The instructor or coach organizes the process through a progression of games. The leagues and playoffs generate the situations that cause the players themselves to analyze ways to win the games.

The game situations put the players into challenging situations they find difficult to handle, and encourages them to learn how to succeed. When the players "need to know," it’s the time for skill drills. The techniques that are learned in the drills are now relevant to the players’ needs and are eagerly performed by the players.

Through the use of small games players can learn the various “playing roles” while they practice essential skills and improve their stamina. Players enjoy learning the game by playing small games. This method of practice makes sense to the players and most importantly, the team gets better. The clear goal of a hockey practice is "to learn to play better."

Small games can be played using eight (and many more possible ways) basic methods of utilizing the ice. All of these methods can use two or more goals and one or more balls or pucks.

Use one zone play in a small area of the rink to practice movement and the use of space. Add rules to practice individual and team thinking (playing roles) skills. In another zone, have another game or a skill drill.

When players play on two nets either cross-ice or full-ice, they automatically learn to position themselves both in offense and defense, and react to the transition from defense to offense and visa versa.

Understanding the Game

THE FOUR PLAYER ROLES

Both in offensive and defensive games, the moves of the players are determined by what role they are playing. The roles are determined by their closeness to the puck and whether they are on defense, offence or in transition. During any of these situations each player will be fulfilling one of the four playing roles.

Role One: the puckcarrier, or for loose puck situations it is the offensive player closest to the puck.

Role Two: the other offensive players who support the puckcarrier by getting open for a pass, screening or giving width
and depth to the attack.

Role Three: the checker (defensive player) closest to the puck or puckcarrier.

Role Four: the other defensive players who cover man-to-man or an area of the ice. All maintain the defensive side and deflect the
attack to the outside. Depending on the distance from the puck and whether he is the third, fourth, or fifth player closest to the
puck, the player in the fourth playing role must support by covering an opponent, switching, or double-teaming.

When each player assumes the proper playing role, the team can think in the same way. There is never a question of the goalie's role, and the same clarity of role and responsibility should apply for every player on the ice. Player roles constantly change in the game, and the players must be able to instantly react in the appropriate manner in all game situations.

The puckcarrier must always move into open ice, but it is too difficult to be effective if his teammates don't also move into open ice. One defensive player always tries to force the puckcarrier wide out of the danger areas, and the other defenders support and eventually gain possession of the puck.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090912125147456

By Juhani Wahlsten and Tom Molloy


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, September 12 2012 @ 04:10 PM GMT  

Beginner Games to teach skating and introduce playing concepts

These are games to get new players moving on the ice in the proper balance position. Games are also used to introduce the 4 game playing roles.

Using Games to Teach the Game Level 0 – non skaters

ABC’s of Intenational Hockey: A program to develop the Complete Player

Using Games to Teach the Game.
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Games to Develop On-Ice Agility
D, ROLE 1
GAME OF CATCH WITH A PARTNER:
Play a game of catch with a partner. Use a ball and stand about 9-15 feet/3-5 meters apart. This will stress balance on the skates.
D-0001
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Games to Develop On-Ice Agility
O.D, ROLE 1
GAME OF CATCH WITH A PARTNER WHILE MOVING AROUND IN A SMALL AREA OF THE ICE:
Play a game of catch with a partner while moving around a small area of the ice, throwing and catching the ball. Groups larger than 2 can be used. This game helps in developing balance, using the edges, turning and stopping.
D-0002
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525081227233

Games to Develop On-Ice Agility
D, ROLE 1
GAME OF KEEP-AWAY USING A BALL:
The players must throw and catch a ball against another team. Play 1-on-1, 2-on-2, 3-on-3, etc. Make sure all players have gloves to protect the hands from the skate blades. This game works all of the skating skills and develops split vision.
D-0003
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Games to Develop On-Ice Agility
D, ROLE 1
GAME OF HANDBALL:
2 teams play full ice. Regular goals are used. All players must handle the ball before a goal counts. Use the ringette crease, only the goalie can be in the crease. If the ball or Frisbee hits the ice the other team gets possession. All skating skills are practiced in this game.
D-0004
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525081258429

Games to Introduce Game Concepts and CoordinationD, ROLE 1
GAME USING ONLY THE FEET, AS IN SOCCER FOOTBALL:
Each player has a pylon and places the pylons for goals all over the ice. The player dribbles the puck with her feet and scores at as many pylons as possible in 1 minute. The coach times the activity and has 5-7 games of 1 minute. After each game the coach asks who scored the most goals. Game skills are introduced and coordination on the ice is the focus. www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525081313805

Games to Introduce Game Concepts and CoordinationD, ROLE 1
1-ON-1 GAME OF SOCCER FOOTBALL:
The player scores by kicking the puck against the pylon. Each player has a pylon and places it acrossice from his partner. Split vision, agility and turns are emphasized in this activity.
D-0006
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Games to Introduce Game Concepts and CoordinationD, ROLES 1 AND 2
2-ON-2 GAME OF SOCCER FOOTBALL:
Play a cross-ice game with the players in teams of 2. Score by kicking either the puck or a ball and hitting the pylon. 1 pass must be made. Offensive and defensive principles are learned, as well as change-of-pace skating.
D-0007
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Games that Practice Team Play and Skating Posture
D, ROLE 1
PYLON HOCKEY:
Use a large pylon instead of a stick. In this full-ice game a goal is scored by pushing the puck over the other team’s goal line with the pylon. This game practices keeping the knees bent and head up while skating.
D-0008
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Games for Agility and Quickness
D, ROLES 1 AND 2
BRITISH BULLDOG:
This game has the players line up at the end of the rink in the A2 formation. 1 player is at the blue line and calls out British Bulldog. The players try to skate to the other end without being touched by the player at the blue line. If you are touched you join the player who is calling British Bulldog. To be good at this game the player must turn quickly, change speeds, and be agile.
D-0009
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Games for Puck-Handling Ability, Speed and Quickness
D, ROLES 1 AND 3
BRITISH PUCK DOG:
The players line up behind the goal line; when the player in the middle yells British Puck Dog they stickhandle the puck, trying to get to the end without being checked. If a player loses the puck he/she is in the middle checking. Last player with a puck wins.
D-00010
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Games for Agility on Skates and Bending the Knees
D
GAME OF FREEZE TAG:
Players play in 1 zone. 1 person is it. When a player is tagged they must stay in the spot they were touched. To be free another free player must slide on his/her stomach between the frozen players’ legs. This game uses all skating skills, especially agility on skates. Make sure all players are wearing their hockey gloves.
D D-0011
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Games for Agility on Skates and Bending the Knees
D
RACES PULLING A PARTNER WHO IS KNEELING
The players hold 1 stick in each hand and pull a partner 1 length of the ice. At the other end they turn and the partner pulls the first skater back. Stress bending knees and toeing out. This activity causes the skater to toe out, using more of the skate blade and a longer stride.
D D-0012
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'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Thursday, September 13 2012 @ 03:15 PM GMT  

Organizing the Ice for Games

A coach has to be able to use space well in order to run effective practices. This is a guide on ways to coach using games.

D1 Basic Formation
D-coded exercises are the most important part of the teaching system, because they involve the
game itself. The other exercises all lead up to the D exercises, acting as building blocks for
learning how to play in game-like situations.

Teaching points:
D1 uses the whole ice with two nets. The model used is the traditional and natural way of learning
by playing using "scrimmages", but rule variations enable the coach to use the ice more
effectively.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525081957828


D100 Formation
D100 formation is another formation that uses the whole ice with two nets, however the extra players wait on the side boards or the bench.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525081957828

D2 Basic Formation
Games are played cross-ice with nets, pylons, lines on boards, etc. as the goals. Special rules
allow the players to practice individual or team play skills in this smaller area. In this formation,
many game understanding, reading and reacting skills will naturally be developed. This
formation encourages creativity and split vision in more realistic situations.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082023546

D200 Formation
D200 formation is similar to D2 basic formation except the extra players line up along the blue
lines.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=2010052508203349

D3 Basic Formation
In the D3 formation, the ice surface is used by having a full ice game across two zones and a
cross-ice game at one end. This formation is very useful if the skill levels or size of the players
vary. More advanced players can use D1, while the others play in D2 formation. This formation
is very helpful when one end is needed to practice skills that don't have much movement. The
game can go on in two zones, techniques can be taught in the third zone.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082049156

D300 Formation
D300 formation is similar to D1 and D2 formations except the extra players are lined up either
on the boards or the blue line.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082100841

D4 Basic Formation
In the D4 formation the players either use one third or one half of the rink and both teams shoot
on the same net, as in half court basketball. In order to go onto offence, the defense must carry
the puck over the blue line and then turn back into the zone. If half of the rink is available, the
defense must carry the puck as far as the red line before turning back and attacking. All players
must get on-side in these games; this rule promotes skating and much more realistic playing
situations.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082119406

D400 Exercise
D400 formation is similar to D4 formation except the extra players line up along the boards in
the neutral zone.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082129900

D5 Formation
D5 formation is the combination of D4 and D2. Two zones are used for playing half-ice games
where the players must touch the blue line with their skates before going on offence. The neutral
zone is used for a cross-ice game.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082140839

D500 VARIATION
D500 Variation is similar to D5 except the extra players are lined up along the boards near the blue lines. Rule variations enable the coach to use the ice more effectively and focus on specific skills and techniques.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082148816

D6 FORMATION
Description:
When the coach has four goalies at their disposal, a D6 formation may be used. By playing a regular full ice game with two nets on each goal line, 4 goalies can be accommodated. The coaches should emphasize that goals do not count if the scorer did not make eye contact with the goalie before shooting.
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20100821114214589

D7 Formation
In the D7 formation the players are put into 8 teams and play 2 1/4 ice games at each end of the rink. Each game can have special rules or all of the games can have the same rules. It is an excellent way to make use of the entire rink. Up to about 40 skaters and 4 goalies can all play at the same time. Of course , the bigger player need more space and smaller teams.

The tight situation causes the players to have to read and react quickly and develop quick moves.

Many drills can also be done using this formation when you have large groups and multiple goalies. It is a great way to share the ice and play tournaments or set up a combination of games and skill activities.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?s=20100821115710425

D8 FORMATION
In the D8 formation the players are divided into 8 teams, and they play 4,
quarter-ice games; each game has 2 nets. This works best if there is a rink
divider along the red line to keep the puck in one end of the ice.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080721131657867

Multi – Puck Games to Teach Split Vision for Young Players

D1 - Playing with More Pucks using Full Ice
Playing with more pucks enables the coach to increase the amount of activity on the ice. More
game-like situations are created for the players to solve. To keep the game safe, there can be
no hitting or slap shots. All players should keep track of their goals. For beginners, you can use
many pucks and ask them to score as many goals as possible. After a while, ask how many goals
each player has scored. If the goalie is making a save, the puck carrier must protect the puck
and wait for the goalie to be ready before shooting.

Roles 1 and 3

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082207197


D1 - Playing with 7 Puck
Two teams gather at center and the coach drops 7 pucks. If the goalie is making a save, the
puck carrier must wait for the goalie to be ready before shooting (the shooter and the goalie
should have eye contact). The first team to score 4 goals wins, and another game begins. Make
sure that there are only 7 pucks and the pucks are left in the net after a goal.

Roles 1 and 3

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100525082224608

Playing with 3 Pucks
Playing with 3 pucks causes some things to naturally happen. The players must look around with
their heads on a swivel so they know what is happening behind them. Some variations are
everyone on the ice or 5-on-5 with line changes. Keep score and the team that scores twice
wins. Next game, start with two pucks, and then one. In order to avoid confusion, only have
three pucks on the ice at one time, the extra pucks can be on top of the nets. Another idea is a
timed game where the goalie puts the puck back into play after a goal.
Roles 1 and 3

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Playing with 2 Pucks
Playing with 2 pucks has the same basic purpose in the system as all multi-puck games. The
goalie puts the puck back into play after a goal. A good technique is to give a point to the team
that scores two goals. Playing with two pucks at more advanced levels is a good read and react
exercise when you play situations such as 3-on-3.

Roles 1 and 3

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'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Friday, September 14 2012 @ 04:43 PM GMT  

These ideas are from IIHF Hall of Fame Coaches Juhani Wahlsten of Finland and Vladimir Jursinov of Russia. They both played for their countries in multiple Olympics and have coached at the highest European pro levels. Jursi has coached many Soviet and Russian Olympic teams. Juuso coached many pro and has been a hockey developer extrodinaire. They both have helped many players get the the NHL.

Horst Wein also contributed many ideas about using 'games to teach the game'. Horst is famous for his Games Method in Field Hockey and Soccer Football. He helped design the Football program in Barcelona which is renowned as the best development program in the world.

So it isn't this coach from Calgary thinking of all of these things. I am sharing ideas I learned from some of the top minds in the coaching world.

I hope the coaches that read these ideas are open to them and the main themes of the Coaching ABC's which are 'ENJOY THE GAME' and 'THE GAME IS THE GREATEST COACH'.

Maybe we can reverse the statistic of 80% of players in Canada and other places quitting by the age of 14 to 80% staying in the game. We coaches have contributed to players quitting because the second most common reason they give is that the hate practice.

MAYBE IT IS TIME FOR A CHANGE IN OUR APPROACH
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D, GAME ORIENTATION: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

PLAYING ROLES 1 AND 3 IN PRACTICE

A cross-ice game of 1-on-1 is the simplest and best way to teach the role of the puck carrier (number 1) and the checking player (number 3) in practice. The player either attacks or defends during a 1-on-1 game and the transition from defense to offence and vice-versa is automatically experienced. The players are organized in pairs and play a cross-ice game for 1 minute. When the game ends the players on 1 side of the ice move down 1 goal, with the last player moving to the empty goal at the other end. Play 1 game against each player on the other side of the rink; the players keep track of their wins, losses and ties.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120914095045203

D, GAME ORIENTATION: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

PLAYING ROLES 1-2-3-4 IN PRACTICE

5 cross-ice games. The players experience the 4 playing roles in practice during a 2-on-2 game.
The players continuously change their playing roles from puck carrier (number 1) to offensive support
(number 2), or closest checker (number 3) to defensive support (number 4). The players are
organized in pairs and play a cross-ice game for 2 minutes. When the game ends the players on
1 side of the ice move down 1 goal, with the players at 1 end moving to the empty goal at the other
end. Play 1 game against each team on the other side of the rink; the players keep track of their wins,
losses and ties.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090928080533500


D, GAME ORIENTATION: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

THE NUMBER OF PASSES AND LEARNING THE GAME

An effective way to teach the 4 playing roles is to have rules about how many passes are allowed.
The fewer passes the more individual play (role number 1and role number 3). The more passes the
more team play (role number 2 and number 4).

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D, GAME ORIENTATION: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

CHANGING THE 4 PLAYING ROLES WITH MORE THAN 2 PLAYERS

When the players understand the constant changing of playing roles in the 2-on-2 games they are
ready for 3-on-3 and then 4-on-4 games. These games add the dimensions of the triangle and box
in offensive and defensive situations. Play a crossice game in each zone for 2 minutes, then have the
teams on 1 side move down 1 goal; the last team go to the empty net at the other end of the rink.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090928080535793


D, GAME ORIENTATION: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

CHANGING THE 4 PLAYING ROLES WITH MORE THAN 2 PLAYERS

When the players understand the constant changing of playing roles in the 2-on-2 games they are
ready for 3-on-3 and then 4-on-4 games. These games add the dimensions of the triangle and box
in offensive and defensive situations. Play a crossice game in each zone for 2 minutes, then have the
teams on 1 side move down 1 goal; the last team go to the empty net at the other end of the rink.

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090928080535793


D, GAME ORIENTATION: LEARNING THE GAME

FULL-ICE SMALL AND MODIFIED GAMES

Play full-ice micro games of 1-on-1, 2-on-2, 3-on-3 to practice the 4 playing roles in the defensive, neutral
and offensive zones. Use modified rules to create the situations that you want the players to practice. These rules can be designed to practice good habits (always face the puck), develop skills (only wrist passes are allowed) or team-play concepts (2 points for a goal scored from a play originating below the goal line encourages offensive cycling and low defensive coverage).

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D, GAME ORIENTATION: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

A HALF-ICE GAME WITH BOTH TEAMS SHOOTING ON 1 GOAL

Play a half-ice game using any number of players. Individual skills can be isolated in a 1-on-1 game. All
of the 4 roles are practiced in a 2-on-2 game. Defensive and offensive triangles are used in a 3-on-3 game and a box offence and defense on a 4-on-4 game. 5-on-5 has all of the team-play components.
All even- and odd- numbered situations like the power play or the 6-on-5 can be practiced.
Some methods of transition from defense to offence are: • All players must get onside and the puck carrier must touch the red line before attacking. • All players must touch the puck before scoring.
• Pass to new players who are waiting in the neutral zone to attack, either against the original attackers or
new defenders.

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D, ROLES 1 AND 2: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

CROSS-ICE GAME STRESSING EYE ON THE PUCK/GOOD POSTURE

A fundamental rule is that the players must always face the puck during a game. Everything that happens
in hockey is in relation to the puck. The players must see the puck in order to know their playing role and be able to switch from 1 role to the other. This helps eliminate unnecessary turns and useless skating. At the same time the coach can emphasize the proper skating posture, so that players are always in the ready position.

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D, ROLE 1: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME USING ONLY THE FOREHAND

Play a game where the puck can be controlled only by using the forehand side of the blade. The game affects not only puck-handling but also the movement of the player’s lower body. When the player changes direction he/she must skate around the puck on the backhand side, this causes the hips and shoulders to go in different directions. It is also a good rule for learning to pull the puck toward the skates, to beat a player or prepare to shoot.

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3. D. ROLE 1: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME USING ONLY THE BACKHAND

Play a game where the puck can be controlled by using only the backhand side of the blade. The
game affects not only puck-handling but also the movement of the player’s lower body. When the
player changes the direction he/she must skate around the puck on the forehand side, this causes
the hips and shoulders to go in different directions.

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D, ROLE 1: PUCK-PROTECTION SKILL: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME HOLDING THE STICK WITH ONLY THE TOP HAND AND PROTECTING THE PUCK

The players are only allowed to hold the stick with 1 hand. This causes them to set up a wall to protect
the puck with the body, and skate to open ice away from pressure.

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D, ROLE 1: STICK-HANDLING SKILL GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME WITH HANDS CLOSE TOGETHER NEAR THE TOP OF THE STICK

Play a CROSS-ICE game of 1-on-1. The rule is the hands must be close together at the top of the stick. This enables the puck carrier to make big moves, roll the wrists and manipulate the puck more easily.

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D, ROLE 1 AND 3: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

KEEP-AWAY

Play keep-away in 1 zone. The players protect their puck and try to knock other pucks out of the zone.
The last player with a puck is the winner.

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D, ROLE 1: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

FLAT-FOOTED SKATING

Play cross-ice or half-ice allowing only flat-footed toe-out, toe-in skating, where the blades never
leave the ice. This is a good strengthening exercise and good practice in toeing in and out, as well as
unlocking the hips while skating.

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D, ROLE 1: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME WITH LEGS WIDE APART WHILE FAKING

The player tries to combine the lessons learned in the other games. When he approaches the opponent
he should have hands close together, legs wide apart, use head and shoulder fakes and protect the
puck with the body. Pressure on the inside edge of 1 skate enables the player to turn very quickly.

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D, ROLE 1: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

“NO-PASSING” GAME OF SHINNY WITH MANY PLAYERS

Play with large teams using “no-passing” rule. The player with the puck must try to score by stickhandling
the puck through everyone. This game demands that each player practice the first playing
role of the player with the puck, and move his or her feet, pivot, fake, drive-skate to open ice, etc.

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D, 4 PLAYING ROLES: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME STRESSING THE 4 GAMESITUATION PLAYING ROLES

Play a game and remind the players that they always have something to do during a shift:
1. Player with puck.
2. Offensive player without puck.
3. Defender covering puck carrier.
4. Defensive player covering pass receiver.
When a “0” or loose-puck situation occurs the players must consider whether they should think offence or defense first. Always protect against giving up odd-man rushes and give the first player to the puck close support for passes and defensive help.

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D, 4 PLAYING ROLES: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

2-ON-2, 3-ON-3, FULL-ICE GAMES

The best way of learning the 4 playing roles is to play 2-on-2 and 3-on-3 games. When playing these
full-ice games the normal rules, such as offsides, are enforced. These games with 2 or 3 players on a
side make it easy to isolate the individual or teamplay skills that the coach wants to work on. The small groups keep all of the players actively involved and the coach can easily point out the techniques or tactics that are being done properly, as well as those that need to be worked on. Organize by having the players line up along the boards in the neutral zone or sit in the players’ box. The shifts should be 30-40 seconds. Playing in small groups for 30-second shifts is a good way to practice support on offence and defense. Another option is to have the players change on their own when the puck is deep in the offensive zone.

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D, ROLES 1 AND 2: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME WHERE THERE MUST BE AT LEAST 1 PASS BEFORE A GOAL COUNTS

In order to practice roles 1 and 2, make the rule that there must be at least 1 pass before a goal
counts. This rule encourages players to look for teammates and to get open for a pass.

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D, ROLES 1 AND 2: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

GAME ALLOWING ONLY 1 PASS

By allowing only 1 pass the player must try to score by drive-skating to the net and teammates must
support by screening, picking and going to the net for rebounds.

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D, ROLE 1: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

MOVING WITH THE PUCK GAME

Play a game with the rule that the players cannot pass the puck until they have taken 4 or 5 quick
strides to open ice. By drive-skating with the puck the player learns to find open ice, creates space for
him or herself and opens up new passing lanes. Drive-skating with the puck is fundamental for successful
individual and team play, and is one of the most important good habits to teach players.

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D, ROLE 1: GAMES TO TEACH THE GAME

QUICK HANDS AND FEET GAME

The development of the speed of the hands is often ignored when introducing hockey skills. When
playing in tight, crowded areas, both quick hands and quick feet, moving at maximum speed, are
needed for the player to escape to open ice. When the hands and feet both move there is a separation
of the upper and lower body motion, and this makes the player difficult to defend.

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'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Tuesday, September 18 2012 @ 03:29 PM GMT  

D - Learning to Play the Game by Playing

This is a continuation of the theme of 'The Game is the Greatest Coach.' Teach the game by playing full and SAG games with good habits, skill and team play rules.

This is the way to develop creative problem solving players. The hard technique skills are the tools must be practiced in drills and then the games teach the soft skills of how to use the skills under game pressure and to solve the game situation problems.

This problem solving ability is what is lacking in most players and games are a teaching technique to help the players be expert problem solvers.

Most of this material was written by Juhani Wahlsten in collaboration with Vladimir Jursinov. Finnish and Russian IIHF Hall of Fame coaches.

The attached PDF has the diagrams.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
D, ORIENTATION: Learning the Game

GAMES TO INTRODUCE THE CONCEPTS OF OFFENSIVE POSITIONAL PLAY


A good way to teach the importance of the positional game is to play a game with wingers staying
on their side of the ice near the boards until they enter the offensive zone. The farthest they can
ever go is to the middle of the ice in any zone. When they have learned to stay on their wing, then
let the wing and center switch positions. Make sure that the center takes the wing’s position on the boards. To make sure the defense joins the play, goals are allowed only when the entire scoring team is over the blue line.



D, ORIENTATION: Learning the Game

GAMES TO INTRODUCE THE CONCEPTS OF DEFENSIVE POSITIONAL PLAY


The main idea of the defensive play is to maintain the defensive side between the attacker and the
net and protect the middle lane. In defensive zone coverage,make the player first funnel to the middle
in front of the net and then find his/her own man. A good rule to teach defensive zone coverage is for
the closest defender to go where the puck goes, and the other players play a box formation.



D, ROLE 1: Games to Teach the Game

RINGETTE WITH STICKS TURNED UPSIDE DOWN


The players turn their sticks upside down and play ringette using 1 ring in a full-ice game. Shifts of
5 players are used. Goals are scored by shooting the ring into the net. Make the rule that all players
must handle the ring before a goal counts. The ring is easier to carry than a puck, so the players use the
edges more when skating, and have more time to find an open teammate. This is also a great game to
teach angling, defensive side and checking because the ring is impossible to get if you simply stick check.


D, ROLES 3 AND 4: Games to Teach the Game

HALF-ICE GAME OF 3-ON-3 WITH THE DEFENDING TEAM SKATING BACKWARDS


In this game the entire defending team skates backwards and makes a defensive triangle in front of
their net, playing as if they were killing a penalty. The idea is to play so that every player protects the
middle lane facing the opponent, and stays on the defensive side between the opponent and the goal.



D, ORIENTATION – LEARNING AND TEACHING THE GAME

The main principle of learning is to move from simple to complex. This principle also applies when
learning to play hockey. The best place to develop hockey skills is on the ice. The countries that have
natural ice have a great advantage in learning to skate. In-line (roller) hockey, street and floor
hockey, and all ball games, especially goal-orientated games, help the player not only to learn the game,
but also how to use the techniques in the right time and the right place. The reality in most places
is that the young players seldom have the luxury of an expert as a coach. This is why we promote regular
and modified games as the greatest head coach and the best teacher.



D, FULL-ICE GAME WITH 45-60 SECOND SHIFTS: Games to Teach the Game

Break team into 2 teams of 2 lines.

Play full-ice with the rule that a player can only handle the puck for
3 seconds and then must pass. The coach blows the whistle and the next group of players who are
lined up along the boards come on. The player with the puck should pass to the new teammate coming on.




D100, FULL-ICE GAMES – THE EXTRA PLAYERS ON THE BOARDS: Games to Teach the Game

Play full-ice games of 1-on-1 to 4-on-4.

The extra players are located on the boards and can either be
actively playing (pass and receive) from their position or they passively wait for their turn. For a variation, allow a player to give and go pass with an extra player. If the play is successful he may join the play for the rest of the shift. All the players who give and go can join the play.



D, ORIENTATION: Games to Teach the Game

USING SMALL TEAMS WITH MODIFIED RULES TO LEARN TO PLAY


Use small teams in cross-ice, half-ice or full-ice games to learn the 4 playing roles. The extra players
can go to the bench or wait on the sides where they can participate by being passed to and passing,
or they can be passive and simply wait for their turn.


D, 4 PLAYING ROLES: Games to Teach the Game

GAMES TEACHING ALL 4 ROLES AND TRANSITION


Play 5 cross-ice games of 2-on-2. All 4 playing roles are practiced in a 2-on-2 game. During this game
the players continuously change their playing roles from a puck carrier (1) to offensive support (2) or
closest checker (3) and to the defensive support (4). Play for 2 minutes. At the end of the game have
the players leave the puck in the middle and return to their nets. Rotate the teams by moving down 1
goal and the end player going to the goal at the other end. Count the wins, ties and losses.


D, ORIENTATION: Learning the Game

THE NUMBER OF PASSES AND LEARNING THE GAME


A good way to teach the game is by defining how many passes the attacking team are required or
allowed to make. Play cross-ice games and limit the number of passes that can be used by the attacking
team. For example, the simple rule of not allowing return passes (the player can not pass back to the
passer), or saying that only 1 pass, 2 passes, or 1 pass per zone is allowed affects the reaction of
both offensive and defensive players. If only 1 pass is allowed, then the pass receiver must drive to the net (1), the defender must play a 1-on-1 (3), the supporting players can pick screen or go for rebounds (2),The other defenders cover the passing lanes and clear the front of the net (4).



D, 4 PLAYING ROLES: Games to Teach the Game

PLAYING A GAME WHERE THERE MUST BE AT LEAST 2 PASSES BEFORE A GOAL COUNTS:


There must be at least 2 passes before a goal counts. This teaches on-ice awareness, offensive
support and passing skills. On defense, 1 player should check the puck carrier, the other player
should cover the pass receiver, both from the defensive side. This practices the final 2 playing roles.



D. 3. ROLE 1: Playing Skills

GAME WITH THE PUCK CARRIER TAKING AT LEAST 4 OR 5 QUICK STRIDES TO OPEN ICE BEFORE PASSING


Game with at least 1 pass, but the puck carrier must take 4 or 5 quick strides to open ice before
passing or shooting. This is the most important habit the puck carrier can have. When you skate hard to open ice it gives time and space to make the next play.



D, ROLE 1: Playing Skills

GAME WITH WRIST PASSING ONLY


Wrist passes are more deceptive and easier to control than slap passes. Teach wrist passing by
playing a full-, cross- or half-ice game where only backhand or forehand wrist passes are allowed. If
a slap pass is made the other team gets the puck.



D, ROLES 2 AND 4: Playing Skills

FACEOFFS


In a controlled scrimmage, have faceoffs in all areas and teach offensive and defensive positioning and
coverage. A general rule is that you always protect the middle first, and usually wings cover defensemen,
center covers the center and defensemen cover wings. Picks, screens and stunting can also be practiced.



D, ROLE 1: Playing Skills

GAMES STRESSING WINNING LOOSE PUCKS IN THE OFFENSIVE ZONE


The closest player must go after “loose pucks” as quickly as possible. The other players support
according to their distance from the puck. To create these loose puck situations during a scrimmage,
dump the puck in from the neutral zone and forecheck.





D, ROLES 1 AND 3: Basic Skills - BODYCHECKING

GETTING USED TO BODY CONTACT


Play a game without sticks, similar to British Bulldog. 1 team skates through the other team, waiting in the neutral zone, that tries to block them from crossing the blue line. Take turns playing defense.



D, ROLES 1 AND 3: Basic Skills - BODYCHECKING

GETTING USED TO BODY CONTACT WHILE CARRYING A PUCK


Have a contest between 2 teams. 1 team waits in the neutral zone without sticks. The other team
tries to stickhandle through the neutral zone without getting bodychecked. Allow only legal checks.



D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Playing Skills - Escape Moves

PASSING WHILE SKATING BACKWARD:


Play a half-ice game or a game of keep-away where the puck carrier must skate backwards before passing. This practices protecting the puck, keeping the feet moving and pivoting. If you watch Sydney Crosby, this is one of his favorite moves. The puck carrier now sees 270 instead of 90 degrees. It also gives the passer more time and space to make a play.





D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Playing Skills - Escape Moves

PASSING AFTER MAKING A TIGHT TURN


Play a cross-, half- or full-ice game or a game of keep-away where the puck carrier must make a
tight turn before passing or shooting. This practices skate fakes, protecting the puck, keeping the feet
moving and pivoting. After the players get used to this move they may make either a full or a half pivot. This allows them to read the defensive pressure and adjust.



D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game

“GIVE-AND-GO” GAME


The first pass receiver must return the puck to the passer, who can then pass to another player, who
must now give-and-go. This game teaches players to support by following their pass. The give-and-go is the foundation of team play, so the player must learn to pass and break to open ice.



D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game

“GAME WITH NO “GIVE-AND-GO”


Game of 3-on-3 and more. The pass receiver cannot return the pass but must find another open player. This promotes support and split vision. Most players can see the teammates in front and to the side of them, but only the better players see the late players joining the play.




D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Playing Skills

PLAYING SKILLS ONE-TIMER SCORING GAME


Playing a cross-ice (D2) or half-ice game (D4) with the rule that goals only count if they are scored using a one-timer shot. Players must always face the puck and get into good shooting position before the pass comes. As players advance to higher levels there is less and less time and space to make plays. They have to be able to shoot quickly and hit the net.



D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Playing Skills

GAME WITH SWITCHING POSITIONS


Play a cross-ice (D2) or half-ice (D4) game. The rule in the game is that the offensive team must cross in front of the defenders at least once before scoring. This encourages the attackers to follow their pass, isolate the widest man and try to create a 2-on-1 situation. The defenders must talk to each other after they have decided whether to switch or keep playing the same attacker.



D, ALL PLAYING ROLES: Learning the Game

2-ON-2 FULL ICE PASSING-EACH ZONEGAME


Play a full-ice 2-on-2 game passing the puck once in each zone. If the puck is gained in the neutral zone
the players have to pass 2 times, if in offensive zone 1 time. After shooting in or taking a shot, 1 pass
game is played.


D, ALL PLAYING ROLES: Learning the Game

2-ON-2 REGROUPING GAME


A full-ice 2-on-2, 3-on-3 game in which the teams must regroup at least once before entering the offensive zone. This game works on close support and the breakout reads. It also teaches the players to maintain puck control. The rule is, “Don’t give the puck away; they have to take it from you.”



D. ROLE 3: Learning the Game

GAME STRESSING IMMEDIATE PRESSURE BY THE CLOSEST DEFENDER


In a small-area game, stress that the closest defenseman pressures the puck carrier. It is important
to get immediate pressure on the puck from the inside out. This delays the attack, deflects it wide and hurries the puck carrier into making mistakes. Deep in the zone the defender must quickly close the gap and make contact. If the defender is not in good control of the puck, and if the offensive player has good control, then maintain the defensive side by stopping and going back while staying on the defensive side.




D. ROLE 3: Learning the Game

GAME OF 1-ON-1 STRESSING THE DEFENSIVE SIDE


The players play a full-, half -or cross-ice game, but the defender learns that he or she knows where
the puck carrier is going – to the net. The coach teaches the defender to always stay between the
puck carrier and the defender’s goal. This is the first step in teaching good defensive technique. When backchecking the defender must keep the attacker on the outside, to stay on the defensive side.




D, ROLES 3 AND 4: Learning the Game

GAME WITH STICKS UPSIDE DOWN IN THE DEFENSIVE ZONE


A good teaching technique is to practice defense while holding the sticks upside down in the defensive
zone. This helps the players to focus on staying between their check and the net, with their shoulders square to the puck carrier. They must stop and start, and learn to always play the body deep in their own zone. The coach can blow the whistle and signal that the sticks may be held properly, and the other team can defend with their sticks upside down.



D, ROLES 3 AND 4: Learning the Game

DEFENDING THE SLOT


Play a full-ice game of 2-on-2, 3-on-3, 4-on-4, 5-on-5, with shifts of 30 to 60 seconds. The main principle
of defending is simple. It is to control the slot area in front of your goal. Concentrate on determining who is covering each attacker by the red line and deflect the puck out of the middle lane. All players maintain defensive-side body position and keep sticks in the passing lanes.



D, ROLES 3 AND 4: Learning the Game

COMING BACK DEEP IN A FULL-ICE GAME OF 2-ON-2 OR 3-3


The coach emphasizes that the closest checker gives immediate pressure on the puck carrier and deflects the attack from the middle. The second player in the zone supports from the front of the net. The third player covers the point and picks up the attacking third player if he joins the play deep in the zone. It is important for the defenders to stay with their checks and not chase the puck.


D, ALL PLAYING ROLES: Learning the Game

2-ON-2, 3-ON-3, LEAVING THE ZONE AFTER THE PUCK GAME


In this game the puck must go out of the zone before any of the players who are breaking out. This game causes the offensive unit to play compactly and allows short breakout passes. In a turnover situation the defending team has the whole unit in a good position to defend.



D, ORIENTATION: Learning the Game

LEARNING THE PLAYING ROLES IN 3 ZONES


To teach the player roles in all 3 zones, play a full-ice game of 5-on-5 but leave various numbers of
players in the neutral zone. To create a 5-on-4, 1 player on the defending team stays outside of the
blue line in the neutral zone. If 2 defending players stay then it would be a 5-on-3. If 1 from each team
it is a 4-on-4; 2 from the defending team and 1 from the attacking team is a 4-on-3. Pass the puck up to the player in the neutral zone, then the play goes the other way with the same number of players waiting in the neutral zone.




D, ORIENTATION: Learning the Game

PLAYING ON 1 GOAL


Play a half-ice 1-on-1, 2-on-2, 3-on-3, 4-on-4, 5-on-5 or any odd-numbered situation to practice the 4
player roles, the rules and transition from offence to defense. The unit that gains the puck either plays
the puck to neutral zone to a new unit, or they must carry the puck and all players get onside before entering the zone again. The other option is to have the attacking team pass twice before they can score. All of these rules give sufficient time for the opponent to regroup for defense.


D, ROLES 1, 2 AND 3: Learning the Game

HALF-ICE TRANSITION GAME OF 1-ON-1 THEN 1-ON-2


Part One:
1 offensive player attacks 1-on-1 versus a defender. A backchecker follows the play from the boards and gives defensive support from a few meters away on the defensive side, (a).

Part Two:
When the defense regains the puck the backchecker skates to the red line and turns back, trying to score on a new defender who has skated from the lineup on the boards, and plays a defensive 1-on-1, (b).
To work on all 4 roles, you can do this as a 2-on-2 with 2 defenders supporting and then going on offense versus the original attackers.

Variation:
To enable the defender to get into the neutral zone, the original backchecker skates to the far blue line before turning back to attack.



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'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Wednesday, September 19 2012 @ 04:53 PM GMT  

Learning the Game Using Games

D, ALL 4 ROLES: Learning the Game
CHANGE ON FLY

Practice changing lines on the fly. When a new line goes out they defend, attack, defend, shoot the puck
into the corner farthest from their bench. If they have trouble getting the puck out on the first rush, then
dump the puck in on first rush and change.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
OFFENSIVE POSSESSION BEHIND THE OPPONENT’S NET

When the puck is behind the opponent’s net number 2 and 3 should move toward the faceoff dots where
it is hard for defenders to cover, or they can screen the defensemen. An offensive defenseman can move
into the slot for a pass.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
GAME WITH CYCLING IN THE OFFENSIVE CORNER

To create space from the corner the puck carrier (1) skates up the boards, if he or she is pressured, pass
back to the corner and the player in front of the net (2) gets the puck. The original passer (1) skates to the
high slot and becomes number 3. Number 3 goes to the front of the net and replaces number 2, (a).
Rotate the other way if the first pass is made away from the net, (b).

D, ROLE 3: Learning the Game
GAME PRACTICING DEFENDING THE PLAY OUT OF THE CORNER

In this game the rule is that goals only count if they are started by plays originating from the offensive
corners. The closest player defends the attack out of the corner. If he or she reads that the opponent
is not in full control of the puck, or has his or her back to the play, the defender should play the body
by wrapping the stick around on the puck and keep the free hand on the back hip.

D, ROLES 3 AND 4: Learning the Game
ALL 5 HAVE THE PUCK IN FRONT OF THEM

This is the strongest defensive position to be in as no one is trapped behind the play. This is a passive
forechecking style that allows the offense to turn the puck up ice, deflect the puck to an outside lane and
outnumber the attackers. Whenever the puck is above the circles in the defensive zone it must be cleared
over the blue line. When pressured high in the offensive zone, dump the puck into the corner or behind
the net. It is a safe play to make when only high-risk offensive options are available to the puck carrier.

D, ROLES 3 AND 4: Learning the Game
DEFENSIVE ZONE COVERAGE

Play a 2-on-2, 3-on-3,4-on-4 or 5-on-5 game focusing on defensive coverage. • The defending players
stay between the puck and the goal, force the puck wide, finish checks, cover their checks, and create
immediate pressure on the puck from inside to outside. All players have a 1-on-1 responsibility in their
own zone. If a defender loses a 1-on-1, then the supporting player defends a 1-on-2. He doesn’t chase
the puck and leave his player uncovered.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
REGROUPING

Play a 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 game and have the offensive team turn back and regroup in the neutral zone at
least once before crossing the offensive blue line. This game practices puck control, offensive support
and not giving away the puck. Many times the defenders slow down or stop. This creates big gaps of
which the attackers can take advantage
.
D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
REGROUPING WITH A STRETCH MAN

Play a 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 game. Have the offensive team turn back and regroup in the neutral zone at least
once before crossing the offensive blue line. All but 1 player should come back to regroup. 1 player stays
high and stretches the opponent’s defense.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
FULL-ICE SHOOT-IN GAME

Play a full-ice game of 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 and practice the forecheck by dumping the puck into the offensive
zone after crossing the red line. After the shoot-in a maximum of 2 passes are allowed before taking a
shot.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
GAME WITH NO PASSING ALLOWED IN THE OFFENSIVE ZONE

The player is not allowed to pass but must try to score after crossing the offensive blue line. This game is
designed to work on going to the net. It also forces the defenders to stay on the defensive side and work
on controlling players driving to the net. The supporting offensive players should pick, screen and go for
rebounds.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
4-ON-4 FULL-ICE PASSING ON EACH ZONE GAME

Play a full-ice 4-on-4 game with the rule that there must be 1 pass in each zone. If the puck is gained in
the neutral zone the players have to pass twice, if in the offensive zone once. After shooting in or shot 1
pass game is played.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
FULL-ICE 4-ON-4 WITH A CONTINUOUS 2-ON-2, 2 PLAYERS OF BOTH TEAMS WAITING IN THE NEUTRAL ZONE

Start with 4-on-4 game. When the puck is over the blue line 2 players from each team wait in the neutral
zone. Once the defending team gains the puck, they pass the puck to the neutral zone and the other
2-on-2 is played toward the other goal. The original defenders and attackers follow to the neutral zone
and go in the other direction when they get a pass. Time the shifts, or have the players in the neutral zone
change on the go after they have attacked and defended once.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
FULL-ICE GAME LEAVING THE DEFENSIVE ZONE AFTER THE PUCK
Play a full-ice 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 game with the rule that the attacking players cannot leave their zone until the puck is over the blue line. This rule forces the players to come back deep and save ice, support the puck and not leave their defensive zone too early.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
FULL-ICE GAME, 1 PLAYER LEAVING THE DEFENSIVE ZONE BEFORE THE PUCK

To create depth in the attack, play a full-ice 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 game with the rule that the farthest player
from the puck can leave the zone before the puck is over the blue line. This stretch man must only go if
he sees that the puck carrier has complete control and will have time to look up the ice.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
FULL-ICE WITH NO PASSING UNTIL YOU HAVE GAINED A ZONE

Play a full-ice 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 game with the rule that the player cannot pass until he or she has gained a
zone. This forces the puck carrier to drive-skate to open ice with the puck and practice his or her moves.
1 pass is allowed in the offensive zone.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
ALL THE PLAYERS HAVE TO TOUCH THE PUCK BEFORE SCORING

Play a full-ice game of 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 in which all the players have to touch the puck before scoring.
This game practices passing and receiving skills and creates the need for close support, requiring the
puck carrier to look around for teammates who must be passed to before a shot can be taken.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
ALL GOALS MUST BE STARTED BY PLAYS FROM THE DEFENCEMEN

Play a half- or full-ice game and only allow goals scored where the original shot or shot pass is from
the point. This encourages the unit to be compact when attacking and the defense to support the play.
The forwards must screen and fight for rebounds. The defense should drag the puck inside the dots
before shooting. It also creates a situation where the backcheckers must cover the points.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
GAME THAT TEACHES CLOSE SUPPORT

Play a full-, cross- or half-ice game but only allow 2 or 3 stick touches, or 1 or 2 seconds with the puck
before passing or shooting. This helps the players to develop split vision and teaches them to look
around before they get the puck. It also forces everyone to support the puck carrier. • Add the rule that
only one-timer shots can be used. This requires that the shooter is ready before the puck gets there.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
PASSING TO THE CLOSEST TEAMMATE

The player with the puck must pass to his or her closest teammate. This causes players to come
back to the puck or support the puck carrier more closely. It also practices making the easy play.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
GAME WITH 7 TO 10 CONSECUTIVE PASSES IN 1 ZONE

Points are given to the teams of maximum 4 players, playing a half-ice game (D4), that can make 7 to
10 consecutive passes. At a more advanced level no return passes are allowed. • Designate what type of
pass must be used, e.g., backhand.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
PLAYING A PUCK-CONTROL GAME

To develop a flow-type of team offense, play games that concentrate on puck control. In this scrimmage
the point is not to score until all players have handled the puck in the offensive zone, while the players
interchange positions following the principles of offense, using width, depth and support at all times. This
game teaches the players to read the play and move into open lanes and supporting positions.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Learning the Game
PUCK-CONTROL GAMES 1-ON-1, 2-ON-2, 3-ON-3 KEEP-AWAY IN HALF OF THE RINK

To develop a flow-type of team offense, play keepaway games that concentrate on puck control. The
game is played as a half-ice game with no net. Start 1-on-1 for 30 seconds. The puck carrier has to
keep the puck away from the opponent by keeping his feet moving, making tight turns and protecting
the puck. After all the players have had 1 turn, play 2-on-2 and then 3-on-3.
• Play 2-on-2 or 3-on-3 keep-away games with all the players active and use these rules:
1. Hold the stick with only 1 hand.
2. Hands close together at the top of the stick and legs wide apart.
3. Players can only use a certain kind of pass, e.g., saucer pass.

D, ROLES 1 AND 2: Orientation
PRACTICE GAME SITUATIONS BY HAVING PLAYERS WAIT IN THE NEUTRAL ZONE

In order to create the various situations that happen in a hockey game, play 5-on-5 and have players
wait in the neutral zone. For example is: practice 3-on-3 at 1 end and 2-on-2 at the other end by having
the last 2 backcheckers and the attacking defensemen wait for the puck in the neutral zone. The other 3
players on each team play 3-on-3 inside the blue line. When the forwards get a clearing pass from their
teammates, who just defended in the 2-on-2 situation, they attack the other net 2-on-2 and the players
who played the 3-on-3 wait in the neutral zone or are replaced by new players. This game can have time
shifts or new players rotate in and wait in the neutral zone after they have attacked and defended once.
The coach can use this method to create even or odd-numbered situations, i.e., continuous 3-on-2 or 2-
on-3.

D, Roles 1-2-3-4: Four Game Playing Roles
POWER-PLAY AND SPECIALITY TEAMS: HALF-ICE 5-ON-5, 5-ON-4 WITH 1 PLAYER IN NEUTRAL ZONE

To practice the power play and penalty killing, play a game of 5-on-5 but leave 1 player on the defending
team in the neutral zone. Alternate who waits in the neutral zone so all players learn to kill penalties.

D, Roles 1-2-3-4: Four Game Playing Roles
HALF-ICE 5-ON-5, 5-ON-3 WITH 2 PLAYERS IN NEUTRAL ZONE

To practice the power play and penalty killing, play a game of 5-on-5 but leave 2 players on the defending
team in the neutral zone. Alternate who waits in the neutral zone so all players learn to kill penalties. If
your team uses 2 defensemen when 2 men short, then 2 forwards stay outside of the zone. If 2 forwards
are used on the kill, then 1 forward and 1 defenseman wait in the neutral zone.

D, Roles 1-2-3-4: Four Game Playing Roles
HALF-ICE 4-ON-4, 4-ON-3 WITH 1 PLAYER IN NEUTRAL ZONE

To practice the power play and penalty killing, play a game of 4-on-4 but leave 1 player on the defending
team in the neutral zone. Alternate who waits in the neutral zone so all players learn to kill penalties. If
your team uses 2 defensemen when 2 men short, then 1 forward stays outside of the zone. If 2 forwards
are used on the kill, then 1 defenseman waits in the neutral zone. 1 player on the defending team stays in
the neutral zone. This allows 2 units to work on power play and penalty killing. Alternate who waits in the
neutral zone so all players learn to kill penalties.

D, Roles 3 and 4
DEFENDING THE SLOT WITH A PASSIVE BOX AND 1

• Play a game inside the blue line. The defensive team stands in the slot area in a 2-1-2 formation. They are in a tight box with 1 forward in the middle. The defenders are only allowed to take 1 stride.
• If the puck is coming out of the corner the defenseman takes 1 step toward the puck and the forward in the middle fills the corner of the box. The weak-side forward sags into the slot and the strong-side forward collapses down 1 stride.
• The offensive team can do anything it wants to score. The defenders keep their sticks in the passing lanes, play the body, control the attackers’ sticks in the slot and fight for rebounds. Have the same thing going on at both ends. The offense gets 1 minute to score, then switch and allow the defense to attack.
• The main principle of defending is simple; it is to control the slot area in front of your goal.
• When teaching defensive zone coverage the coach should show the players where to skate back to in
order to protect the slot area.
• Defend from inside out, always staying between the opponent and the net. As the puck gets closer to the goal more man-to-man coverage is used on players without the puck. The slot area is where the defenders skate to on defense, trying to force the puck to the outside and up the boards. (Bob Murdoch)

D, Roles 3 and 4
ONE-THIRD ICE GAME WITH AGGRESSIVE 2-1-2 DEFENSE

The defense sets up in a tight box with 1 forward in the middle. The description of the 1 checker
pressure and a box behind follows:
• The offense starts with the puck at the blue line.
• The closest defensive player pressures the puck from the inside out and makes contact with the attacker.
• When the defender does this the middle forward rotates to his or her place at the puck-side corner of the box and all the defenders move to the strong (puck) side of the ice. Deep in the zone, usually 1 defenseman checks the puck carrier; 1 defenseman covers the attacker in front of the net; the first backchecker backs up the defender in the corner; the second backchecker covers the mid slot and weak-side point and the last backchecker covers the strong-side point. If the first forward back is checking the puck carrier, then the strong-side defenseman is in a low support position.
• The remaining 4 players have sticks in the passing lanes and are on the defensive side of the offensive
players.
• When pressuring the puck the defender skates in straight lines and always finishes checks. The middle forward supports the 2-on-1 attack from the inside of the box, always in a position to maintain the defensive side of the check while supporting the first checker. When the play goes to another area the closest player forces the play in the same way. All players are responsible to cover 1 attacker and defend a 2-on-1 if a teammate is beaten.
• If the defenders maintain this tight box and create immediate pressure by the closest defender on the
attackers, they will be able to control the slot area in front of their net. (Bob Murdoch)

D4, Roles 1-2-3-4
A GAME BATTLING FOR LOOSE PUCKS

The D4 game is played in 1 zone. The players from each team line up behind the faceoff dot just outside
of the blue line. The coach stands with pucks just outside of the blue line, in the middle of the rink. The
first player in line on each team moves forward just inside the blue line and plays the point. On the whistle,
1, 2 or 3 players from each team; or varying numbers of players, up to 3 from each team, go after a puck
that is shot into the zone by the coach. The active players can pass to the pointman who must shoot or
pass, but can’t skate deep into the zone or on the other half of the ice.
When the defending team gets the puck they have to pass to their point before they can attack. Play
shifts of 30-60 seconds, then blow the whistle and shoot in another puck.
(Art Krusel)


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Thursday, September 20 2012 @ 02:51 PM GMT  

Over the years I have posted video examples of games that can be used to teach the game. These videos are from teams and groups I have coached in various parts of the world as well as videos I have taken while other teams practice and some that have been sent to me.
They are not professionally done and many times I am talking with other coaches as we watch together. I apologize for this but those are the breaks.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Game Video from Hockeycoachingabcs.com – Examples of how to use games to teach the game. Some videos have the same game but with different rules or are examples from different countries.

D200 Keepaway U22
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120806085000699

D200 2-2 Shoot Either Net-Flames
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120717094107392

D4 Jokers Behind the Net
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120425092815856

D4 Baggo - Czech U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120418133212608

D6 Game Formation – Variations
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120418100540886

D2 Cross Ice Game Using Blue Stripes for Nets
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120417102111470

D200 2-2 one Joker on Sides Finnish U17
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120417103938348

D500 Nets Back to Back – One Goalie
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120416224928657

D200 Various Situations
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120414100043714

D9 - 4 Teams x 4 Nets
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120318093412931

D4 Two Pass - Swiss U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120313082015545

D200 3 on 3 Swiss U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120306173701201

D Mike Johnson Small Games on Ice Demonstration
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080719131254145

D Mike Johnston-Benefits of Small Area Games
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101218120519682

D Multiple Puck Games
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723161232706

D1 Full Court 3 Team Scrimmage
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=2012013110134174

D1 Shinny - Russian U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120302093038534

D1 Full ice 2-2 or 3-3
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723161231260

D1 Game Using Different Balls, Rings, Pucks
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802104427602

D1 Game-One Pass in Each Zone
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=2011032414361323

D1 Game-Two Second Rule
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110324143851598

D1 Games for good playing habits.
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723172054482

D1 Give and Go Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723172050676

D1 Pass to the Open Player
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110606091347910

D1 Two Second Game - One Goalie
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110612133904232

D1- A2 Puck Dog
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802114801644

D100 - Roles 2 and 4 Specialty Team Scrimmage
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723183918140

D100 - T2-4 – Full Ice Specialty Team Practice
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802114800166

D100 At Least One Pass Per Zone
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111005185017852

D100 full ice 2 on 2
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802104425248

D100 full ice game for Skill
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080719153345141

D100 Two 1 on 1 games at once
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080719153346728

D2 and D200 Cross Ice Games with Rules
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802104424493

D2 Cross Ice Game-Sweden
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100414094539964

D200 3 on 3 with 3 Pucks
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=201110060922424

D200 3-3with 3-2-1 Pucks
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111005185636266

D200 Angling Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111005185904685

D200 Cross Ice 1-1, 2-2
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090817103544663

D200 Cross Ice Game of 1 on 1
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090817103540217

D200 Game Of 2-2 then Outnumber Situations
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802114759629

D200 Game With Jokers at Both Ends
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090817103542544

D200 Game with Jokers in the Middle
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110827123618880

D200 Kings Score Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110701095316958

D200 Small Area Battling Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101224071639751

D200 Straight on Angling Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111005190114923

D200 The Time Machine Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110701100217720

D200 Two Cross Ice Games with Jokers
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=2008072320283431

D3 Skill Games
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723165243635

D4 Attack and Defend the Dot
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101218074836562

D4 Baggo
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111026162931520

D4 Bago 1 second game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723165242343

D4 End of Practice Game-Washington
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101210084232659

D4 Game Forehand Pass Only
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723165244782


D4 Game of Two Pass - Slovakia U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120104090932478

D4 Game to Teach Onside to Young Players
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723165245685

D4 Game Variations
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=2009080211050878

D4 Game With Escape Moves
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802112351405

D4 Game With Goals Started Below the Goal Line
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723172051625

D4 Games with Modified Rules
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802112350881

D4 Give and Go Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802112347625

D4 half ice game with the rule that you can only carry the puck max 2 seconds and goals must come on one timers.
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802110504768

D4 Keepaway and Score
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101220072253253

D4 Two Pass - only Forehand
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111005184904487

D4 with Forehand Passing only
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=2009080211050757

D4 - 3 Games at the same time
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090802110505180

D400 3-2 on2 Nets x 2 U16 Boys
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120821112657506

D400 1-1 Battles - HC Dukla
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100821114618838

D400 2-2 passes from behind net – Sweden
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120131091959989

D400 Goalies Face Opposite Directions
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101221142814546

D400 Team Play Scrimmage
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090730123919178

D400, 1 on 1 Small Power Play Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101230082436186

D5 - Skill class SAG with Jokers
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111021093048709

D5 Keepaway 5 Pass Rule
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080723183915331

D5 Keepaway with Rules
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080719120633805

D5 Tournament-3 Games-Different Pucks
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20110627090918840



'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Monday, September 24 2012 @ 09:18 PM GMT  

I had a long conversation with Mike Hartman last night. He is a former NHL player, Stanley Cup winner who has done a lot of coaching for USA Hockey and with pro's etc.

The topic turned to the small games model that is being promoted now. We both agreed that for these games to be effective they must have a purpose. An effective way to use games to teach the game is to have special rules. These rules focus on a skill, good habit, team work, or any part of the game you want to isolate.

My class today did some games using cross ice and then a variation with one 2/3 ice and one 1/3 ice game happening at the same time. We played 3 games and each had a purpose. Before the games we worked on puck handling and loosening the shoulders with big moves.

Game One: D2 - cross ice game with the rules there must be at least 2 passes but you have to beat a defender before passing.

Game Two - cross ice game D2 - Only 1 pass Allowed Receiver must score.

Game Three - D6 Variation 2 - Two Passes and All Must Score before you can score a second goal.

Game one encourages passing and getting open but in order to beat a defender you must skate away from them to open ice. This is the most important habit a player can have when they get the puck.

Game Two allows one pass, so a fake pass is an effective move. Theme of the practice is stickhandling and the pass receiver must make moves, dekes and protect the puck in order to score.

Game Three passing rule causes passing, getting open, covering away from the puck to happen. All must score forces everyone to participate hard and get open so they can score. It also requires the players to get their head up and do things like screen away from the puck.

I was taking the video so no coach was enforcing the rules in two of the games. The older players are used to modified rules and were doing them. The beginner group has more trouble because they are struggling with the basic skating and puck handling but it is good to teach them how to play at the same time.

So rules must be enforced to be effective.

Here is a video of the three games.
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120924155404927

The basic format I use with this group in the 60 minutes is.
- 10 minutes - individual choice, they can shoot, pass or play games.
- 20 minutes - instruction and drills for the day's lesson.
- 30 minutes - games and contests where they use the skill vs opposition. We use many nets and many games at one time.

This group wll get 56 one hour ice times over 10 months and it costs them about $700 each. They also have an off ice class at the school each week with their teacher.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Tuesday, September 25 2012 @ 02:44 PM GMT  

This is from our coaching manual. Juhani explains the value of using games in practice and what games teach players. He also comments about the Role of the Coach.
--------------------------------------------------------

A PROGRAM FOR DEVELOPING THE COMPLETE PLAYERPLAYING

by Juhani Wahlsten (Turku, Finland. IIHF Hall of Fame player and coach category.)

These hockey-playing principles contain reads and habits that make it possible to develop players who have skill and also understand how to play the game in all of the 4 game-situation playing roles, as well as offensive, defensive and loose-puck situations.

Even though hockey is a team sport, it is individuals who play the game. Each player needs to have the proper information about the
game principles in order to solve the frequently changing game situations on both offense and defence.

TEAM PLAY – STARTING TO READ THE GAME

When playing the Game-Situation Roles, reading and reacting are the keys. This approach is strengthened by playing a lot of small games and creating game-like situations. This philosophy, following the game principles, simplifies all the game strategies.

THE CHANGING ROLE OF THE COACH

The old, one-way coaching and communication style, in which the coach taught players what to do and what not to do, became a coach’s game‚ with a lot of predictability and little creativity. It did not provide much room for the player’s natural reaction to game situations.

In hockey, set patterns are needed to a certain extent, but by following the principles of Read and React (in this case, to the the 0-1-2 Team Situations and to the 1-2-3-4 Playing Role Situations) the players learn to play the game efficiently and effectively. In other words, players learn the game faster and better and learn to be more creative in the process. They understand the game better.

Learning to play hockey is no different than learning anything else, whether learning mathematics or learning to play a musical instrument. In mathematics, there are right and wrong answers. In a hockey game, the answer and the outcome of the training or the game action(s) can be evaluated by whether or not the puck is in the net.

When the coach starts to follow the Learn by Doing principle it changes the coach’s role. In the new role the coach allows the game and the contest to take care of learning. The result is winning more and losing less. When this happens, the coach’s most important task is to organize and manage the learning process. Coaches must now create activities in which the players can learn from game-like situations.

Coaches must ask the question, “How do I get the players to solve problems by themselves?”

Playing Principles – Team Play

The great Russian coach and hockey teacher, Vladimir Yursinow, (over 60 of his players play in NHL) is a great student of the game. Learning from his experience, his coaching today is vastly different than it was in the past.

As a young coach he wanted to force the players to do things HIS way. Today he wants the players to think for themselves and solve the problems. Now, when he teaches the power play, he simply names 2 power-play units and makes them find their own scoring solutions. Only when the players want him to help does he show them some variations for solving the problem. He states “My role is just to decide which one of these two power plays is better. Similar to when I chose the girl I liked the most and asked her to be my wife.”

The coach or teacher is more and more an information resource, and less the star of the practice.

The answers to “why”‚ and “how”‚ become important, rather than the traditional “what”.

A knowledgeable coach looks for the best drills or games to manage the learning process, then makes the players work for themselves, understanding why they must do certain things to be effective.

This method motivates the players to learn more and provides an environment in which they learn faster. Additionally, and more importantly, it teaches life skills that can be applied outside of the rink, in daily life.

NATURAL PROGRESSION
Let’s read the game as a coach through the 4 game-situation roles. Reading the game always starts by reacting to the continuous loose-puck situations (0-game). This creates a 1-on-1 situation with game-situation playing roles 1 and 3 (1-3 game).

When this 1-on-1 is created, reading and reacting becomes an issue. * Hypothetically, if there was no support the game situation would remain 1-on-1.

* The speed at which the 4 teammates without the puck react in their offensive and defensive game-situation playing roles, to give support to their teammates in roles 1 and 3, is the decisive factor in a team’s success in any team sport.

A 1-on-1 becomes 2-on-1, or 1-on-2, or 2-on-2 depending on how the closest supporting teammates react. In other words, the game can be seen as a continuous series of small games within the game. There are battles in small areas all over the ice, both on offence and defence, to gain superiority – trying to outnumber the opponent in an area or regain an even-number play situation.

In reading the small game, the players who are not involved “in” the small game are reading the game "out" of this situation from their position, and are ready to be part of a similar “in” game while their teammates now take on the role of playing away from the puck.

The key is to understand the difference between being in the battle for the puck (game-situation roles 1 and 3) and supporting the puck (game-situation roles 2 and 4). In practice it means triangles all over the ice. The rule is that if the player is not playing in those 2 immediate game-situation roles, he must support from an area away from the puck and read and be aware of how many teammates or opponents he sees.

The third player is in the key position to read the game (grey circle). If there are 2 attackers, then the closest offensive player should support to outnumber the opponents 3-on-2, or the closest defender to a 2-on-3 situation should support to gain an even number, 3-on-3, situation with the opponent.

The other 2 players on each team farthest from the puck should see all their teammates and support from a distance: on offense by backing up the attack; on defense by covering a zone while still being responsible for 1 opponent who then covers from the defensive side.

Playing Principles – Team Play

THE GAME

The game consists of the combined movements of the puck and the players who share the simple objective of scoring and preventing the other team from scoring. All of the player’s actions should be focused on these simple objectives.

To achieve their objective, the offensive players try to get into the slot for a shot while the defensive players prevent them from shooting from the slot. The offensive team has the puck as an extra tool. If used properly it is the fastest thing on the ice and can give the attackers an advantage. If the puck is carried too much, then the advantage is lost; defenders can skate faster without the puck than the player with the puck can skate. Puck control is the best defense but it requires good individual skills and team cooperation. Carrying the puck to free ice and then passing to open teammates are the tools for puck control. Any development program must focus on these skills.

ANTICIPATING THE NEXT PLAY

Hockey is now more of a transition and puck-position game than a puck possession game. The defenders pressure the puck all over the ice to create turnovers, followed by quick attacks that can trap the players on the team that just lost the puck, and create a numerical advantage.

Playing decisions should be based on “What happens next”. Will there be a rebound, a chance for a second play, or what happens if the other team gets the puck?

To prevent losing the puck and being outnumbered, the rule for the offensive team is: Only lose possession of the puck in areas from where you can defend without getting outnumbered.

Losing the puck outside the big ice (the middle lane between the dots) is not as dangerous because the players have time to protect the middle and get on the defensive side between the puck and the net.

The most dangerous play is to lose the puck in an area that creates the situation that the puck-carrier’s team is going one way and most of the team that just lost the puck is going the other way. This creates outnumbered situations and usually results in a good scoring chance. The rule is: “Don’t try to beat a player 1-on-1 if you are in a high-risk area.” Get the puck in deep on the attack, regroup or get it over the blue line if you are on a breakout.

The most dangerous areas to turn the puck over are: in front of your own net, from the defensive blue line to the top of the slot; on either side of the offensive blueline. Shooting the puck to an opponent at the far blue line is a better play than losing it just inside the blue line. At least the puck is far from your net and all 5 players are in a strong defensive position. The team that can make the transition from defense to offense the quickest usually wins the game. So the key concept in team play is to: “Attack so that if you lose the puck you are in a good position to defend and defend so that you can attack quickly on a turnover.”

This means that the players must move up and down the ice as a compact unit in order to give quick support. Close support allows short passes and quick counterattacks that create 2-on-1s and attacking triangles.

TEAM PLAY STARTS FROM 1-ON-1 CONTESTS

The game consists of a series of different movements of the puck and the players.
The main learner is not the team but rather each individual player. The better skilled a player is, the better that player can use his/her skills in helping the team achieve improved game results. All winning tactics are still based on this truth. “It is the individuals who make the difference.”




Playing Principles – Team Play

WHAT A 1-0N-1 GAME CAN TEACH

It is so much easier to destroy than to build. The systems based on defence can achieve occasional wins, but in the long run they will not win championships. When winning the game is the only thing on the coach’s mind, he/she can be tempted to play a simple defensive game. Sometimes, if a team is unskilled, it is the only way to win. However, in any reasonable, long-term development program the emphasis should be based on the development of puck-control skills.

Knowledgeable coaches all understand that it takes more time to develop the skills to control the puck, i.e., stickhandling, passing and shooting, than the time it takes to just learn to play team defence.

Modern high-speed training does not just mean skating fast, but more the ability of the whole unit to read and react, to get the fastest object on ice, the puck, to do the work.

In a game, the difference between the time a team spends on offence and defence is the key to success. The difference comes from reacting to a loose puck situation (Game Phases 0).

The game has 3 playing phases: loose puck (0), offence (1), defence (2). In an average game, the team spends 30% of the time battling for loose pucks (0), 35% of the time playing with the puck (1) and 35% of the time playing without the puck (2). If a team can win more loose pucks than its opponent, the team spends more time on offence and has a greater opportunity to score.

WHAT ELSE 1-ON-1 TEACHES

Besides teaching the Game-Situation Roles 1 and 3, the 1-on-1 using a D2 crossice game, teaches the most important part of the game: the transition from defence to offence and from offence to defence.

The 1-on-1 also teaches the best and most effective way to score. The player must first defend, win the puck and then rush by the opponent. This creates a breakaway because the original attacker lost defensive-side positioning. From the reading point of view, it teaches the defender to NOT over commit and lose the defensive-side; it teaches the attacker to go to the net hard.

A 1-on-1 cross-ice game not only teaches the game but will also readily identify the players’ personal strengths and weaknesses, teaching them the meaning and the necessity of the skill drills and games to improve his/her skill development.

1-ON-1 COMPETITION AS A LEARNING TOOL

Properly understood, competition and contests are the best tools to get players to concentrate on what they are doing.
Winning and losing is part of the game. It also teaches honesty. No excuses. However,winning does not make the winning player a better person. The winner was just better – this game, this time.

In a majority of cases, losing will motivate a player to listen as the coach explains that the defender must practice skating backwards, or that the attacking forward should work on puck-handling or puck-protection skills.

Individual or group contests can be used during practice as one way to get the players to focus on the essentials. 1 game or contest that can be used is to give points to the players, such as 2 points for a rebound goal

Another example is a simple 2-on-0 scoring contest, allowing the players a maximum of 2 passes. This will force the playing pairs to discover whether 1 pass, 2 passes, or maybe even no passes will produce the desired effect. The right answer is found in the net – goal or no goal.

WHAT A 2-ON-1 GAME CAN TEACH
The smallest team-unit is, naturally, 2 players. The immediate goal of an offensive “in” game (the game within the game) is to gain a numerical superiority. This means offering close support to the puck carrier in Game-Situation Playing Role 2.

By increasing the number of passes required, or allowing only one-timer shots before a goal counts, the coach activates the supporting offensive player. On the other hand, playing in “outnumbered” situations forces the defenceman to focus on the main task - defend and stay on the defensive side.
95
WHAT 1-ON-2 GAMES CAN TEACH
A 1-on-2 game, 1 forward versus 2 defenders, teaches communication between the defenders as well as double-teaming. The forward learns, as a puck carrier, to use the open space by keeping his/her feet moving, to protect the puck with the body, to get used to body contact and, when the puck is lost, to defend and play Game-Situation Role 3.

WHAT A 2-ON-2 GAME CAN TEACH
A 2-on-2 is actually 2, 1-on-1s. The 2-on-2 is the most important contest the coach can use to create all 4 game-playing situations and have the 3 phases of the game.

In the 2-on-2 you have:
The puck carrier (1), who needs all of the individual offensive skills and habits as tools to be successful.

His/her teammate (2), who tries to isolate 1 player and create 2-on-1s by using speed, deception, picks, screens and crosses. This supporting offensive player must be able to take a pass and shoot one-timers.

The closest defensive player (3) must do everything to get on the defensive side, and possess all the individual skills and habits to stop the puck carrier and regain the puck.

The other defender (4) must cover 1 opponent from the defensive side and know when to double-team or switch.

All 4 players will be constantly switching between the loose puck, offensive and defensive games, and will learn how to read and react to the ever-changing roles. Once the players can play "in" 2-on-2 situations they will be ready to be the "out" players as 3rd, 4th, 5th players closest to the puck.

SITUATIONS WITH MORE THAN 2 PLAYERS
When more than 2 players are involved, the game actually becomes a game of forming triangles, both on offence and on defence.


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: TomM (offline)  Thursday, October 11 2012 @ 02:14 PM GMT  

TRANSITION GAMES TO TEACH THE 4 GAME-SITUATION ROLES

When the players have learned the basic skills by doing one-way drills where offensive or defensive responsibility is repeated but there is no transition, then it is time to practice using the skills in more realistic situations that demand both good technique and game understanding. Transition games allow the coach to create any numerical situation that happens in a hockey game. The players practice the situation under game pressure in the same zone as it would occur in a game.

Transition Games where players passively wait in the neutral zone and become active when the puck is passed over the blue line.

These games can be used to create power-play and penalty situations or to create various numerical situations at each end.

In levels 5 and 6 transition games the players come into and leave the play according to the game situation, so the coach doesn’t have to be continually blowing his/her whistle, but is free to talk to the players as the game is going on.
Any of the game formations can be used for transition games. The D200 cross-ice games and D600, D700 and D800 small-area formations use the same rules as the DT100 and DT400 transition games that are described below.

HOW TO ORGANIZE A TRANSITION GAME

To organize a transition game the coach must decide what individual or team skill to work on and then devise the game. Take your time and go slowly, first step by step. Let the players do everything in slow motion so that the game is understood.
When the players are comfortable with the flow of the game the coach can add modified rules to practice individual or team skills. The transition game itself is like a template for teaching all the various situations in the game.

Individual and team-skill work can be added by modifying the rules. For example, to work on the team-skill of cycling deep in the offensive zone have the rule that all goals must originate from plays below the goal line. An example of how to work on individual skills would be to designate the number or type of passes that must be used or what kind of shot is required to score. It works best if you start a transition game 1-on-1 and work on game-situation roles 1 and 3. The individual techniques are the foundation for all team play and the 1-on-1 gives all of the players a chance to understand the flow of the game.

After the coach has decided what needs to be worked on and where on the ice it should be done, then the flow of the game – who gets support during the play, determines the type of transition game to use. In transition games you go from offense to defense and from defense to offense. The coach can create the situation he/she wants to work on by having the passive players:

1. Give support to the defense
2. The offense
3. Both the offense and the defense.

When the new players come into the play they must assume the appropriate game-playing role of either offensive or defensive support.

The examples below will show DT100, full-ice games and DT400 half-ice games that show:

Transition games where players wait in the neutral zone for a breakout pass and the play goes toward the other end. This game isolates situations in the neutral zone and at each end (game-situation roles 1, 2, 3 and 4).

Transition games where the attacking team gets support from teammates joining the play (game-situation role 2).

Transition games where the defending team gets support from back checkers (game-situation role 4).

Transition games where both the offensive and defensive teams have supporting players join the play (game-situation roles 2 and 4).

As the play continues their roles change from defensive to offensive or offensive to defensive responsibilities and all 3 playing situations: offense, defense and loose puck will be encountered.

DT , ORIENTATION – Learning the Game

PRINCIPLES OF USING TRANSITION GAMES TO LEARN TO UNDERSTAND THE GAME

• All defend-attack-leave half-ice and full-ice games can isolate the defensive-zone team-play skills of 1-on-1 up to 5-on-6 as well as the penalty-killing skills.
• All attack-defend-leave half-ice, full-ice and crossice games can isolate the defensive-zone teamplay concepts from the 1-on-1 up to 5-on-6.
• All continuous half-ice and full-ice games with both offensive and defensive support can be used to practice specific positions in all situations.

All full-, half- and cross-ice games where 1 defensive player waits outside of the defensive zone are good for practicing defensive skills in outnumbered situations, e.g., 5-on-5 full-ice game with 1 defensive forward staying in the neutral zone creates a 5-on-4 in the zone.

DT100 DEFENDING 3-ON-3, 2-ON-2, IN THE DEFENSIVE ZONE

Attack-Defend-Pass-Leave Sequence.

In order to isolate offensive and defensive situations: play a full-ice game of 5-on-5 where each team leaves 2 players in the neutral zone when 1 team attacks 3-on-3 and 2 players from each team stay in the neutral zone as the opponent attacks the other goal 2-on-2. The game
is organized in the following manner:
• 1 team attacks 3 versus 3 and when the defending team gets the puck they pass to the neutral zone and there will be a 2-on-2 situation at the other end.
• In the 3-on-3 situation, 1 line plays 2 defenseman and 1 forward as a backchecker while defending. The other 2 forwards attack 2-on-2 the other way.
• The other line has 3 forwards on offense and 2 defensemen for the 2-on-2 at the other end. Many other numerical situations can be practiced using this method. Have all forwards take turns being the backcheckers.
• Halfway through the game, change so the other team plays the 2-on-2 and 3-on-3 situations.
• The shifts can be timed or the players can change on the go after they have attacked and defended.
* Any number of players from 1 to 5 can wait in the neutral zone.
• A modification of this game is to have the defensive team wait in the neutral zone and play against the team that is breaking out of their defensive zone.

D100, FULL-ICE DEFEND-ATTACK GAME

This game works on all situations up to a 3-on-3 but is especially good for teaching the 4 game situation roles deep in the offensive and defensive zones. In this game you line the players along the boards in the neutral zone.
• Start with a 1-on-1 situation with a player from the lineup supporting the attacking player at the point.
* * The offensive player tries to score and the defensive player tries to regain the puck and attack the other way.
• After a goal, or when the defender regains the puck and crosses the blue line, he/she attacks the other way versus the new player at the point. The original defender goes to the back of the line.
• At advanced levels the coach can add more players and a regroup in the neutral zone with the original players follow the play until the puck crosses the offensive blue line.

D100 FULL ICE DEFEND GAME WITH A PASS TO THE POINT

This game works on all situations up to a 3-on-3 situation. The pass to the point creates a situation where the defender must keep the attacker from screening the goalie, getting a pass or scoring on a rebound.
• Start with a 1-on-1 and the attacker gets support from a teammate waiting in the neutral zone when the puck crosses the blue line.
• The attacker may pass to the point. The point man cannot walk in and shoot, but must pass or shoot within 2 seconds. This enables the defender to continue playing the 1-on-1 low. (This simulates that the point man is being covered.)
• After a goal or when the defender crosses the blue line, he/she attacks the other way versus the new player at the point. The original attacker goes to the end of the line in the neutral zone.

At advanced levels the coach can add more players and a regroup in the neutral zone with the original players not leaving until the puck crosses the offensive blue line. This is great for working on defensive gap control.

HALF-ICE DEFEND-ATTACK GAME WITH A PASS TO THE POINT

• Start with a 1-on-1 and the attacker gets support from the lineup in the neutral zone when the puck crosses the blue line. The attacker may pass to the point. The point man cannot walk in and shoot, but must pass or shoot within 2 seconds.
• This enables the defender to continue playing the 1-on-1 low. The pass to the point creates a situation where the defender must keep the attacker from screening the goalie, getting a pass or scoring on a rebound.
• After a goal or when the defender skates out to the red line with the puck, the point man mirrors him and turns, defending the original goal.
• When the defender crosses the blue line with the puck, the original attacker goes to the end of the line in the neutral zone.
• At advanced levels the coach can add more players and a regroup in the neutral zone. The new offensive player skates to the far blue line before turning back to attack.

ATTACK-DEFEND GAMES

3.Transition games where the defending team gets support from backcheckers (role 4).

FULL-ICE ATTACK-DEFEND GAME

Use the D100 formation starting with a 1-on-1 game with the extra players waiting in the neutral zone.
• The defensive player gets support from a teammate when the puck crosses the defensive blue line.
• The 1-on-1 now becomes a 1-on-2 and the original defender concentrates on the attacker’s body while the backchecker picks up the puck and attacks in the other direction while the original attacker backchecks.
• When the puck crosses the offensive blue line the defending player gets support from a teammate making it 1-on-2.
• On a goal, or when the defenders gain the puck, the new backchecker attacks the goal at the other end.
• When the puck is cleared over the defensive blue line the original defending player returns to the lineup on the boards. This flow of, give defensive support, attack the opponent’s net, and then defend, continues. As many as 3 supporting players can join the play or the coach can send 1, 2 or 3 players to support in order to have the players recognize the game situation.

HALF-ICE GAME OF D400 WITH THE EXTRA PLAYERS WAITING AT THE RED LINE

Play either 1 or 2 D400 half-ice Attack-Defend games at once. Teams are organized into 2 lines of 1, 2 or 3 players each. 1 line attacks or defends while their teammates rest near the red line.
• When the defending team gets the puck they must break out over the blue line and pass to a waiting teammate at the red line. If the puck is simply dumped out then it is a loose puck and any one of the active players can get it.
• When a successful pass is made the passive players go onto offense and attack versus the players who were just on offense.
• When these new attackers lose the puck or are scored on, they must defend against the passive players who are waiting for a pass near the red line.

This game works on all 4 game-situation playing roles and the 3 playing situations. Play timed games or up to a certain score. Play tournaments and add modified rules that stipulate individual or team skills.

HALF-ICE GAME OF BACKCHECK – BREAKOUT – ATTACK – DEFEND – REST

In this game the extra players wait along the boards in the neutral zone and backcheck to support the defender when the puck crosses the blue line, making it a 1-on-2 situation.
• When the new defensive player gets the puck he/she skates to the far blue line before turning and attacking the original attacker.
• This flow continues when the puck crosses the blue line and the new defender gets support from a teammate.
• This transition game can be played at 1 or both ends at once. A regroup in the neutral zone can be added to practice keeping a tight gap.

SITUATION ROLES 1, 2, 3, 4

4. Transition games where both the offensive and defensive teams have supporting players join the play (game-situation role 2 and 4).

This is the ultimate transition game to practice all possible play situations from 1-on-1 to 6-on-5.
• To learn the game, start playing 1-on-1 and when the puck crosses the offensive blue line both the attacker and defender get support from the teammates waiting along the boards in the neutral zone.
• The 1-on-1 situation becomes a 2-on-2 and the new supporting players must assume the responsibilities
of game-situation roles 2 and 4.

VARIATIONS:
Create any numerical situation by adjusting how many players support the active players. To create even-numbered situations give support with as many defenders as attackers and as many attackers as defenders.
• That is, on a continuous 2-on-1, 2 players would support on defense and 1 would give offensive support.
• The 2-on-1 and 1-on-2 would become a 3-on-3 in the end zones and a 2-on-1 or 1-on-2 in the neutral zone. A 2-on-2 and 3-on-1 through the neutral zone becomes 4-on-4 in the end zones. A 3-on-2 or 2-on-3 through the neutral zone becomes 5-on-5 at each end.
• The supporting players can simply line up on 1 side of the ice and join the play according to the 1-2-3-4-5 principles of team play, or they can play their own position, i.e., as defensemen or forwards.
In the diagram the forwards are on 1 side and the defensemen on the other side.
• The forwards give support to their defense and the defense give support to their forwards when the puck crosses the blue line.
• In the 1-on-1 to 2-on-2 situation in the diagram the defenseman will support from the point and may jump into the play.
• The forward must cover the new defenseman and then get open for a breakout pass when the defender gets the puck, or go low and pick up a loose puck if the defender pins the attacker.

When you have a continuous 2-on-1 the first backchecking forward must give low support to the defender and the second backchecker must cover the new defenseman. By using this continuous game the coach can teach team-play concepts as well as work on individual techniques.

The coach can adjust the number of supporting players to create uneven situations, e.g., a 2-on-1 with only 1 backchecking forward and 1 supporting attacker would create a 3-on-2 in the end zone and a 1-on-1 in the neutral zone. When 2 forwards backcheck and 1 attacker joins the play, you have a 2-on-3 attack in the end zone and a 2-on-1 through the neutral zone. The situations are limited only by the imagination of the coach.

A HALF-ICE TRANSITION GAME OF1-ON-1 THEN 2-ON-2 IN THE DEFENSIVE ZONE

The team can practice various half-ice situations using this transition game. It is best to have the teams wearing only 2 colors.
• 1 player attack 1 versus 1.
• When the puck crosses the blue line 1 forward (F2), from the defending team and 1 defenseman (D2) from the attacking team follow the play into the zone.
• The backchecker must cover the new defenseman, who supports the attack.
• When the defenders regain the puck or a goal is scored, they break out as far as the red line and then turn back and attack 1-on-1, F2 versus D2.
Keep score and use this method to play games and tournaments. Other situations such as 2-on-1 to 3-on-3, 2-on-2 to 4-on-4, 3-on-1 to 4-on-4 and 3-on-2 to 5-on-5 can be played.

5-6 TRANSITION GAMES

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/Games in one Zone usually using only one net.

Transition Game Explanation
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090726085540163

DT400 - Regroup with Jokers Behind Net
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20120927102225533

DT4 Joker cover Joker at Point - Pass to Point
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20120926092048847

D400 2-2 One Joker Below Hash-Flames
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20120722101349241

DT400 Active Jokers at Point
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20120603101824103

DT400 Game of Quick Transition
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20120416092419455

DT400 2 on 2 with Passive Support
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20120224091730987

DT400 Continuous Game with Back Pressure
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20111029094402757

DT400 Perry Pearn Rotation 4-4
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20111004080131252
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090726102318992
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090726093548924

DT400 Krusel Low Battles - Point Support
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20111004075900564
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090726102317243
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090726093549750

DT400, 4 on 2 with Two Nets
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20101222074135633

DT400 1-1, 2-1, 2-2 Transition Game using 2/3 ice
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090726104059741
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=20090726102315873
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/video.php?n=2009072609354752


DT100 Full Ice Transition Games – Video Examples

DT100 Continuous 2-2 With Regroup - Flames
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120805092902101

DT100 Continuous 2-2 Flames
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20120722101726758

DT100 x 2 Backchecking Transition – Dukla
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100821114214589


DT100 Transition Game with Passive and Active Support
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090803190601255

DT100 Transition Game with both F and D joining the play
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090726093546253

DT100 Transition Game 3-2 to 3-3
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090902091317423

DT100 Swedish Transition Game of 1-1
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100418084335301
DT100 Game of 2-2 with Offensive Support

www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111028075900881

DT100 Explanation of Continuous 1 on 1 Transition Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080719153344585

DT100 Examples of sequence from 1-1 to 3-2 Situations- MRC Women
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090726102316489

DT100 Erkka Continuous 2-1
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101007164507476

DT100 D Join Attack - F Backcheck
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111102073454815

DT100 Continuous Transition Game of 2 on 2 to 4 on 4.
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080719141210845

DT100 Continuous 3 on 2 HC Dukla U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100821122112111

DT100 Continuous 2-1, 2-2-Detroit
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20101208083750407

DT100 Continuous 2-1 HC Dukla U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100821121443520

DT100 Continuous 2-1
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090726085539822

DT100 Continuous 1-1 with 85er's
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090726085538618

DT100 Continuous 1-1 HC Dukla U20
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20100821121211421

DT100 Backchecking Transition Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20080719141212210

DT100 Backchecking Game
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20111102073308428

DT Transition Game Presentation
www.hockeycoachingabcs.com/mediagallery/media.php?f=0&sort=0&s=20090725194239373


'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
By: Anonymous: RookieCoach ()  Friday, September 06 2013 @ 11:51 PM GMT  

Coaches,
I am bringing this post back to the main board. Great detail and understanding into "Games to Teach the Game" . Tom explains in detain the topics and players roles. New coaches check it out for a new understanding of teaching the game of hockey.

RK

By: TomM (offline)  Monday, September 09 2013 @ 04:46 PM GMT  

Thanks RK. I forgot I had put all of the game material together almost exactly a year ago. I will update it with links to the new games posted on the site since Sept. 12, 2012. The links to the diagram, pdf's. and video are in the pdf.

DT4 Must Pass to Joker at the Point

DT 2-4 Gaining Position in the Slot

D2 and D6 Variation Game Formations - D Modified Rules to Teach the Game

DT400 - Regroup with Jokers Behind Defensive Net - CW

DT4 Pass to Active Joker Below Goal Line on Transition

DT400 2 on 2 with Passive Support

D202 Keep-away With Jokers on Line

DT400 One Goal Full Ice Team Play Scrimmage

DT400 Kibyuk Small and Smaller Area Games at Once

DT100 Continuous 2 on 2 D - Join Attack F Backcheck

D400 Small Area 2-1 x 2 Jr. A

DT400 One Pass with Varying Numbers

DT100 Continuous 1 on 1 D - Join Attack F Backcheck

DT100 - 2 on 1 - D Join Attack and F

DT400, 4-2 x 2 - Pro

D200 Coach Call Options - U22

D4, 1-1, 2-2 Battles-Kazakstan Women

D200, 3 on 3 Game With No Passing - European Pro

D200, 2 on 2 + 1 with Jokers on the Side – Pro

E1 D200 Shootout Game

D100, 5-5 With Face-offs

D5 Keepaway Contest to Practice Skills and Good Habits

D200 Multiple Jokers Each Side

DT100 Continuous 3-3 With Passive Support

DT100 Continuous 1-1, D Join Attack

DT100 - 2 on 2 Backchecking Game - Nzone Regroup

MIke Johnston a former university, major junior head coach and NHL asst. coach does a great job in an on ice demonstration of using games to teach the game. It was at a coach seminar in Vienna.

DT100 2-2 With Cutbacks-Regroups in Nzone

D100 Scrimmage Full Ice – Alternate Ends

DT100 Read-Act to Situation 1-1 to 3-3

D200 3-3 with 3-2-1 Pucks

D200 2-2 Shoot Either Net –

D400 Random Reading Game Playing Roles

DT100 2-2 with Regroup

DT400 Multiple Situations in Small and Smaller Area

T2-4 D400 Specialty Team Practice

D400 Best Player Wins the Game 1 on 1 on 1 D400 Best Player Wins the Game 1 on 1 on 1

T4 D400, 3 on 3 Team Play Practice - Pro

DT400 Two Net Game – CW

D200 Start 1-1 up to 3-3

D2-4 Tournament Using Various Pucks and Balls

DT 400 Two Net Game - Joker at Point

D4 - Goals Must Originate Below Goal Line D4 -

DT400 - 2 on 1 x 2

D200, 3 on 3 Game – Pro

D400 - Middle Drive 3-3 - 10 Seconds to Score

D100 Pro 4-4 Tournament I posted this as a demonstration of how the top level players have good habits and great technique.

T2-4, D4 – Reilly Team Play Rotation

D200 - 2 on 1 x 2 Race to Score – Pro
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'The Game is the Greatest Coach'
'Enjoy the Game'
   

TomM



Registered:: 06/25/08

Posts: 2875
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